Seismologist discusses how natural disasters shape us

Dr. Lucy Jones opens up about her new book which offers a bracing look at some of the world's greatest natural disasters and how their reverberations continue to be felt today.
3:16 | 04/16/18

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Transcript for Seismologist discusses how natural disasters shape us
disasters. Recent earthquake, floods and earthquakes have caused sch devastation they're literally chngworld. New a new B called "The bi ones" kes a look and what youould think about before the next one hits kayna Whitworth sat down with the author and joins us now.good morning, kayna. Reporter: Dr. Lucy Jones says the Rd is inevitable but the disaster is not. If W takero steps not remain intact. She says we need to take action now. Thbiggest naturalte the world has ever seen they didn't only causeediate destruction, but in somees changed entire landscapes and populations. It's a level societal edition that's hard to imaginehat's one of the points I'm trying make the big ones are thes that change society. We probably live throu them but they become ay different world. Repr: Theast 30 years caltech's seismologist Dr. Lucyes has bee the first voice ACA hears after an earthqua. Soe the Beyonce of earthquakes. In her new book titled "The big ones," Howat disasters have shaped us and we C do a them, shehy high loop its the devting social impacts of the most expansive disasters ever co My perti Thi allows us to do a more ratl active approach LG through the dters and preserving unities. She says the disaster Yo should be the most concerned about is onelosest to you. Ihis all underwater here. In the winter of2,s was completely underwater. When W modeled what would happen if weeated the 1861/'62 flood we determined that one-quarterf the ildings in California would have flood Dama Reporter: A million and a half people WOU have to be evted. Includg this family. Do you realize Y this flood plain? Iid not K that, no. Reporter: Like Ms of califo,hey have earthquakes in the back of their mind and Dr. Jones says it's only a mat of time before the San Andre fault ruptures. W T San Andreas goes will kill 1800 people and that happens every couple hundred years. Reporter:o she eourages families where to be ready. P a pair of old running S tied T theood of your bed. Wow. And sometimes an extra pair of keys. Becausagain, what are you trying tind when you're trying to get out quickly? To keep your family safe you must have epare your home for a potentiadisaster. Talk to your neighbors and eat a plan to help each other. And think outsidehe home. Make suremunity leaders have an an plan. So she says that everyone should spend a littleime a usgs.com and noaa.govnd getiliar with theisasters that can impact you and have medications and cash in small bills restock yomergency fd stash every year. The book "Thbig ones"s out tomorrow and it isorthedread. A lot of goodadce. To rob. All right, George. Want to switch gears to one of

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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