Snoring Man Gets Eviction Notice

Bruce Menia's snoring is turning his life upside down. His neighbors in this Albany suburb have heard enough, and now his whole family is in danger of losing their home over his involuntary nightly rumblings.

Menia's landlord has said the loud snoring is a violation of his lease, and has asked him to leave the apartment — or face eviction.

Menia, 51, admits he snores, but doesn't believe it's bad enough to force him, his wife and his 7 1/2-year-old stepdaughter out of their apartment.

Up All Night

Beth Hoag lives in the apartment next door to Menia's. Her bedroom shares a common wall with his bedroom, and she says his loud snores actually register on a decibel reader.

"If I had to rate this … because the noise travels through a wall, I'd have to say that on a scale of one to 10, probably an eight or a nine," Hoag said of Menia's snoring.

An estimated 40 million Americans suffer from chronic snoring. Menia, who is participating in Good Morning America's "Snoring Makeover" ("Snoring Solution" airs Thursday), says he felt badly about interrupting Hoag's sleep.

"I said look, if my snoring is bothering you, I want to do something about it," Menia said.

She suggested he help her move her bedroom furniture around so that her bed was not up against that shared wall.

Hoag has been more understanding than Menia's other neighbors. His downstairs neighbor insisted that the landlord, Albany Management, send an eviction notice to Menia and his family.

Evicted for Snoring

In a statement, Albany Management cited a section in the lease prohibiting tenants from making "loud or disturbing noises between the hours of 10 p.m. and 7 a.m.," saying that Menia has "continually failed to heed this provision."

Menia says he is willing to do anything to fix his snoring.

"If it comes down to having an operation or going through a clinic, I'm willing to do whatever I have to do to get to that point," he said. "This is something that is involuntary. I'm not trying to snore and bother people."

For now, Menia and his family are staying in their home, and they've hired an attorney.

"I'm very happy that we're allowed to at least have the holiday season without the turmoil of moving, but I really don't know what's going to happen," Menia said.

"I'm sure my wife will be happy if I don't snore anymore, and I would like to find out if there is something medically wrong that can be corrected."

Medical options for people who want to stop snoring.

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