Read an Excerpt of "Godless: The Church of Liberalism"

In her presentation, "Hot, Sexy, and Safer," Landolphi began by telling the teenagers—who were forced by school authorities to be there—"I can't believe how many people came here to listen to someone talk about sex, instead of staying home and having it yourself." In the dry legal language of the complaint later filed by parents of some of the students, Landolphi also "used profane, lewd, and lascivious language to describe body parts and excretory functions," including "eighteen references to orgasms, six references to male genitals, and eight references to female genitals." (And that was just while thanking the school principal for inviting her.) She asked students to show their "orgasm faces" in front of a camera—which would certainly come in handy for any future on-camera careers in the adult film industry. She invited a male student on stage to lick a condom with her.

After discussing anal sex, Landolphi remarked that one would be "in deep sh—." She told one male student he "had a nice butt" and another that his baggy pants were "erection wear." This did not constitute sexual harassment under the law, because, like Bill Clinton, Landolphi supports abortion rights, one may assume. She concluded ninety minutes of this relentless vulgarity by asking a female student to place an oversized condom on the head of a male student and blow it up.

Like most people who enjoy talking to strangers about sex, Miss Landolphi, to put it as charitably as possible, is physically repulsive in appearance. With a presentation that was about as erotic as phone sex with Andrea Dworkin—or actual sex with Andrea Dworkin, come to think of it—Landolphi may have inadvertently promoted abstinence among the student body by generating widespread aversion to the various activities she described.

It's no wonder Bible Belt, right-wing Christians get the greatest enjoyment out of sex (another scientific study hated by liberals)—they never have to endure listening to liberals talk about sex.

Parents of Chelmsford students immediately brought suit alleging that by forcing their children to attend Landolphi's presentation without prior notice, the school had violated their privacy right to direct the upbringing of their children. But the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit could find no such right in the "living Constitution." The "right to privacy" refers to the right of unmarried couples to obtain contraception. It encompasses the right to kill an unborn baby. It means the right of men to sodomize one another. Where these parents got the idea that "privacy" included their right to keep their children from being forced to make "orgasm faces" in school was anybody's guess.

Tellingly, the federal appeals court also rejected the parents' Free Exercise claim, questioning "whether the Free Exercise Clause even applies to public education."

Thus, the court declared a clearly visible Constitutional clause—not buried in the penumbras—officially inapplicable to government schools. (Perhaps what threw them off was the fact that the free exercise of religion—unlike abortion, gay marriage, and sodomy—is specifically mentioned in the Constitution. You can see how that would be confusing.) Allowing parents to interfere with their children's education might impair the state's efforts to indoctrinate children into the official state religion of promiscuity, recycling, and freeing Mumia Abu-Jamal.

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