Meet the Men of 'GMA' Fit Club

For the last few weeks Diane Sawyer and a determined group of "Good Morning America" women have been doing their best to whip themselves into a diet-watching, weight-lifting and kick-boxing frenzy for the "GMA" Fit Club.

But nothing inspires motivation quite like a little competition and a few male members of the "GMA" staff decided they were up to the challenge.

Without these guys, "GMA" might not get on the air in the morning. But the stress of live television, lack of sleep and junk food galore have taken its toll on some of them. The brave joined "GMA's" Men Fitness Challenge and signed up to take tips from health guru Shawn Rogers.

Kahlief, who works in security, wants to get back into the swing of healthy living.

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"I just want to get my body, you know, back in shape. Where I could feel comfortable walking up stairs and not struggling," he said.

Camera operator Adrian wants the energy to keep up with the job, but he said, "It's tough."

Justin, a production assistant, said that after college he lost the infamous Freshman 15. But after a football injury in his 20s, he gained it all back.

"So, I really got to buckle down," Justin said. "I've been trying since the new year, but I think this'll be good."

Others, like head electrician Ed, have more specific goals in mind.

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"My goal is there's a basketball tournament in April and I want to not injure myself or embarrass myself," he said with a chuckle but then turned serious. "I got three little kids at home. I want to have the energy to play with them and do stuff instead of, you know, 'Daddy, wake up.'"

Technical director Bobby also has kids to consider.

"My daughter Courtney. Every now and then she'll just run up to me and pat my stomach and say, 'Daddy, you havin' a baby?'" he said jokingly.

Camera operator John's little girl calls his stomach "a pillow."

"She told me not to lose it, but I've got to lose the pillow," he said.

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According to the girls of the "GMA" Fitness Challenge, exercise is the biggest problem, whereas the guys say it's food that hits their gut the hardest.

"Mine is ice cream," John said. "You have ice cream in the refrigerator for the kids and they're having one. Um, I'll have one. And, you know, they don't finish it."

And the studio is no different.

"There is constantly, and it's not just what's set out in the morning, but it's all the cooking segments," camera unit worker Ed said.

Nutrition, they all said, is never in the forefront of their thoughts.

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"Bacon's got fiber, right?" electrician Ed said jokingly.

After all the laughs, though, they said they were ready to change their lives for the healthier.

Tune back in to "Good Morning America" Friday 30 to see how the first few days went.

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