Octuplet Grandma Calls Daughter 'Unconscionable'

"The house is full of toys,'' she said. "My daughter has always spent a lot of money on toys and really not helping out with the children or the living arrangements -- never paid anything for rent. Her sense of values is kind of strange because I'm a retired teacher and I'm living off money that I'm making or have for my retirement money and it's not that much. Teachers don't get that much and I'm spending a lot.''

Workers Compensation and Depression

Records obtained by ABC News from the California Department of Industrial Relations show that Nadya Suleman received more than $167,000 in worker's compensation after she injured her lower back during what was described in records as a "riot" at the Metropolitan State Hospital, a mental hospital in Norwalk, Calif., where she worked from 1997 until November 2008.

While she attempted to restrain a patient, another patient knocked a wooden desk onto her back, the records say. She said her injuries were exacerbated by a 2001 auto accident and by her pregnancy.

She received disability payments until at least August 2008. Her employer stopped her payments in July 2001, but she appealed to a workers' compensation appeals board, which ruled in 2002 that she was, in fact, temporarily disabled, and the payments resumed.

Nadya Suleman became depressed as a result of the injury and was prescribed antidepressants, the records say.

Her depression was also due, in part, she said, to "the powerful and uncontrollable emotions associated with her pregnancy -- both the fear that it would end and her elation that it might be brought to fruition and she would realize her dream of having a child," a psychologist wrote after evaluating her, according to the records, which were obtained through an open records request.

She told doctors that she had three miscarriages and found it "terrifying" when she learned she might be pregnant again.

Despite the challenges ahead, Angela Suleman told Curry that her determination and the master's degree she's working toward will carry the day. Still, she said, she understands the public's concern.

"I know I'll be able to afford them when I'm done with my schooling," she said. "If I was just sitting down watching TV and not being as determined as I am to succeed and provide a better future for my children, I believe that would be considered, to a certain degree, selfish."

ABC News producers Scott Michels, Santina Leuci, Jim Vojtech, Sabina Ghebremedhin, Alice Gomstyn and ABC News Research contributed to this report.

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