Howard Stern faces invasion of privacy lawsuit

The "GMA" team of insiders analyzes some of the biggest stories trending this morning.
6:17 | 02/16/17

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Transcript for Howard Stern faces invasion of privacy lawsuit
And we are back with our big board and the legal team here, Dan Abrams, sunny Hostin and a lot of stories we'll get to starting with that bombshell lawsuit. Howard Stern, a woman suing him for invasion of privacy claiming he aired her confidential conversations with an agent at the irs live on his satellite radio show. Let's listen for a second. But when you make the payment it's going to go towards the tax. It's always going towards the tax -- Jimmy. Well, if he's working we can't interrum him. Are you a collector. Yeah, for the government? Because it was about tax. This is a wild, wild story. So this woman calls an irs agent, wants to deal with her taxes. He had been calling Howard Stern and the lines got crossed. He's calling Howard Stern's show to get on the show. He is on hold. He's an irs agent. You know he's got some time to kill. He's on hold. Why not do my job. My job is to take calls from people calling in about questions. Takes the call while on hold on the "The Howard Stern show" and that ends up with the Howard Stern people, they start commenting on it. She's suing now. Now bottom line is typically I don't know this would be that powerful a lawsuit. Why? Because the stern show didn't intentionally go and take it. It sort of was handed to them. The problem is when you're talking about tax return information, the law is very specific. It is different. You can sue for negligence and as a result this is a serious lawsuit. And, sunny, what could be the fallout here? Does she have a case? I hope the irs agent doesn't still have his job. Who does that? I mean, who does that -- You're working. With government property and I think -- Put on hold by the irs all the time. You get the message, you know, we're going to record it for quality assurance, to the to be broadcast all over "The Howard Stern show." I think there is certainly a suit here and I certainly think she's going to win across the board. Aren't we all outraged by just merely hearing it? And I really think that "The Howard Stern show" made a judgment call. I don't think they necessarily just were handed this information. Not only were they handed it they decided to use it. That's where the liability. As a legal matter it's different the supreme court ruled on an issue of a radio station getting an intercepted information and they've said a radio station can use that information. Now -- I think this is different. It's different because it's related to taxes but, look, is it outrageous? That's what Howard Stern and his show does. They do outrage. You know, that's what the whole show is about. You can say, oh, my god, "The Howard Stern show" is awful and shock jocks are terrible. Does the first A.M. Protect them. Absolutely -- I'm saying not in this case. This case is different because you're talking about privacy issues and you're talking about tax -- there's a specific statute that relates to negligently releasing information about someone's taxes. So that's why this is such a dangerous case for them. I've got to believe they'll settle it. They better and think about it, shock jocks certainly are protected but we see this coarsening of our culture and think about don Imus. He was literally fired for calling the Rutgers women's basketball team nappy-headed hos. Those were his words. There has to be a line when we come to these shock jocks. There has to be a line. For entertainment value it's entertaining until it's you then it's not entertaining anymore. I hope the people that criticize him don't listen. That's all I'm saying. We got to move on to our next story. Most people, you dream of, what, hitting a million dollar jackpot. One of Britain's youngest winners Jane park is claiming the money she won at age 17 has ruined her life. And, sunny, at one point thee threatened to sue the lottery company and she released a statement and in it she says she strongly believes the age limit for playing the lottery in the uk should be 16 to 18. Now, increase it from 16 to 18. Yeah. What do you think? Do you think is there a certain age or is 16 too young. I think it's too young. We're talking about gambling. I was in college at 16. I was a crazy person, a nut. There's no 16-year-old -- Don't tell on yourself. 16? I was in college -- doogie Howser but she did things I think adults do, as well. If you look at her Instagram page she purchased a purple range rover. A Rolex. She had some plastic surgery. My question is where the heck were her parents and if you think about it, the curse of the lottery, have you heard about this, 70% of adult lottery winners go bankrupt within the first couple of years. The reason we don't let young people don't buy lottery tickets, it's because we're afraid they'll blow their money. You're 16, you're too young to buy a ticket. You're too young to throw away your money. 18 here. Almost every state it's 18. Three states where it's 21. Iowa, Louisiana, Arizona. It's 21. But, you know, again, the notion the woman who won is serving as the face -- I'd rather see the person who kept blowing $20 a week who is 16 saying, you know what, okay, now I've got sympathy. Used it. Very hard for me to feel sorry for this woman. Champagne problem. Like, come on. You won over a million bucks and, oh, we're supposed to feel so sorry for you because you were too young to buy the ticket. It is a lot of responsibility but like you said you would hope where were her parents? And I will say with this lottery organization, they provide a lot of support. She was provided the opportunity to have a financial adviser, to have a private banker, but she bought a purple range rover instead. Now complaining about it and now threatening to sue over it. Too young. The lawsuit doesn't have much chance. No one on the set is saying this is crazy. This is like -- Why is a 17-year-old buying -- gambling? I'm just saying. I think it's a little crazy too. It's all about how you handle it. A lot of 16-year-olds are like let me win. I have a 14-year-old that wishes -- Ginger has the story behind this waterfall.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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