Laser Pointers Remain Serious Threat to Planes

FBI launches new anti-terror task force to put a stop to this active threat on the runway.
2:01 | 10/19/13

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Transcript for Laser Pointers Remain Serious Threat to Planes
the news this morning about the fbi launching a new anti-terror task force to put a stop to an active threat to anybody who travels by plane. Laser pointers. The danger is most acute here in the new york city area, where there's been a big jump on laser attacks on pilots. And abc's rob nelson is at la guardia right now. Rob, good morning. Reporter: Good morning, to you, dan. These are just tiny, little gadgets. But they are creating big headaches. Not just for pilots and now the fbi, but for all of us who take to the skies. Overnight, the fbi announced it's launching an anti-terror task force, to combat a dramatic rise in incidents of laser pointers being aimed at pilots. It was visibly detected by the pilots in the cockpit. And enough that it caused them to have concern and worries. Reporter: The fbi says in new york, home to two of the nation's busiest airports, reports of flights being hit with laser beams have spiked. And injuries to pilots along with them. If you go from anything from just scaring you and startling you at a critical moment of flight, to actually injuring your vision. Reporter: In 2012, a jetblue pilot was temporarily blinded while preparing to land at kennedy international airport. About 5,000 feet, right? Yes, sir. 5,000 feet. Two, green flashes. And it caught the first officer in his eye. Reporter: The faa reports that since 2004, laser incidents across the u.S. Has shot up from an average to from a few hundred a year to nearly 3,2 incidents this year. There's been incidents at l.A.X., At denver. It's a growing phenomena. Reporter: In march, a california teenager was sentenced to 30 months in federal prison after pleading guilty to aiming a commercial-grade laser at a plane and a police helicopter. Interfering with a flight crew is a federal crime. So, the fbi has looked into the laser incidents over the last several years. We located some of them. Arrested and prosecuted. Reporter: Now, officials really are concerned here because those pointers tend to have their biggest impact during takeoff and landing. Those are the two most critical time of any flight. Folks out there don't know how dangerous these little devices can really be. Bianna? Should not be taken lightly. Rob nelson, our thanks to you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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