Malala Heads to Nigeria in Effort to Help Find Kidnapped School Girls

Pakistani human rights activist joins the desperate search to find the missing girls kidnapped by the terror group in Nigeria.
3:24 | 07/14/14

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Transcript for Malala Heads to Nigeria in Effort to Help Find Kidnapped School Girls
Now to the dire and desperate search to find those more than 200 schoolgirls kidnapped by the terror group in Nigeria. One of the most famous young women in the world, Pakistani human rights activist, Malala, just celebrated her 17th birthday on Friday. She's in the country of Nigeria to help secure the release of these girls. Amy is there. Spoke to her exclusively this morning. Reporter: Robin, good morning. It's Malala day around the world. Her mission began early the morning in Abuja. She's meeting with the president of Nigeria to urge more action from the government looking for the missing girls. This as the group responsible for the kidnapping released a video nok mock the efforts to bring back our girls. Malala in Nigeria, bringing with her worldwide attention. I know you have a birthday wish. This year, my wish would be to see Nigerian girls going to school and the girls that were taken being freed. Reporter: They risked their lives to meet with the girl who stood up with the Taliban. I was hearing the story that girls are being kidnapped. I didn't know what the parents would be feeling. All of them were crying. It made me feel like crying. My father was crying as well. Reporter: She plans to be the voice of these desperate parents when she meets with the president of Nigeria today. You're just 17 years old. That's a lot of pressure. How do you feel about walking into the presidential palace and speaking your mind and speaking for the familifamilies? I'm hopeful my voice will have an impact and will reach to the president and he'll take action. I'm representing people. The people of Nigeria. Reporter: And representing the hundreds of girls abducted by boko harm. Five teenagers who escaped staired their story. This girl said her father was shot and killed. 18-year-old Rebecca says she's afraid but Malala's presence here is bring iing hope. She goes and tells our president, bring back our girls. Reporter: In this newly released video, they make fun of the message. Bring back our army. Reporter: If they're listening to your words right now, what is your message? What they're doing is impacting the name of is lam. It's not the real Islam. They should think about their own sisters and their should release those girls. It's a request, it's a request, please. All: Bring back our girls. Reporter: In the end, she believes this will work. It will be our voice that will defeat the terrorist activities and the terrorism here. Reporter: Malala will address the nation later today. Some of the escaped girls and families of the missing will join her on stage. She'll be highlighting a new initiative, #strongerthan. I'll have more on that and my interview with Malala and the kidnapped girls next hour. Robin? Thank you, Amy. Do share what you're stronger than. That is a remarkably strong young woman. No question. Quite a game, Lara.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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