How Six Survived Brazilian Soccer Team's Deadly Flight

The chartered aircraft with 72 passengers and nine crew members went down en route to the Medellin airport and only a few survivors were pulled from the scene of the crash.
2:17 | 11/30/16

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Transcript for How Six Survived Brazilian Soccer Team's Deadly Flight
To that devastating plane crash with the Brazilian soccer team on board. This young fan is mourning the loss, six people miraculously made it out and David Kerley has more and they've recovered the black boxes. Reporter: That's right, Michael. Yes, they have the black boxes but the question this morning is, the true reported an electrical problem. So do those boxes stop recording information that could solve this mystery? Having pulled six survivors from this crash scene, teams recovered 71 bodies of those who did not survive. And the black boxes which could answer why the commuter jet crashed taking a Brazilian soccer team. Stunned fans overnight holding a vigil. The shock seen on the face of one of the youngest fans and two injured players who didn't make the trip to the team's first ever finals. The jet was headed to the Medellin airport which is surrounded by mountains. ABC's Steve ganyard has flown into that airport with the Colombian military. Even at daytime it is a sporty place. Rugged terrain and oftentimes weather and high altitude. Reporter: The pilots reported an electrical failure and an emergency before the aircraft tail hit a mountain and the rest of the jet slid down the other side. But how did those six people survive? The wreckage will help provide the answer. Increasing the odds of survival, those sitting within five rows of an exit and passengers in the aisle fare better than those in window seats. There's no way to game it and say if I sit in the front the back will hit first. It depends on the mishap. Every mishap is a little unique. Reporter: Odds already on the flier's side. More than 95% of plane crash victims survive. In fact, a professor who studies this says you have a better chance of becoming president of the United States or winning an olympic gold medal or a Nobel prize, Michael, than ever dying in a plane crash. Wow. I have one question for you. Why is it better to sit in an aisle than a window seat. Reporter: It's because if something happens and you do go down you can move quicker to that exit and get out than somebody who has to move two seats, get to the aisle and get to the exit. All right, David, makes a lot of sense. To Amy with the morning's other stop stories starting with

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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