Florida Teen Murder Trial: Michael Dunn Claims Self-Defense

Defense for the man accused of killing an unarmed teenager theorizes that the victim had a weapon.
3:00 | 02/07/14

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Transcript for Florida Teen Murder Trial: Michael Dunn Claims Self-Defense
Right now to that murder trial in Florida you were just talking about. It began as a fight over loud music, ended with the death of an unarmed teenager. Michael Dunn admits to killing the teen but is claiming self-defense and ABC's Ryan smith is tracking the case. Good morning, Ryan. Reporter: Good morning, George. Michael Dunn is being charged with both murder and attempted murder for shooting into a car full of young men and killing Jordan Davis in the process. But as this trial gets under way, we're seeing fierce arguments in court both from the prosecution and the defense and witnesses are stepping forward to talk about what they saw and heard that night. Stop and listen closely. Oh, my god, somebody is shooting. Reporter: Those are the gunshots that rang out at a Jacksonville, Florida, gas station on black Friday, 2012 ending the life of 17-year-old Jordan Davis and this morning prosecutors continue pressing their case against this man, 47-year-old Michael Dunn who they say murdered Davis after an argument over the teen's loud music. In opening statements Thursday, prosecutors painted a software developer as a cold, calculating killer. Michael David Dunn pointed a semiautomatic pistol at four unarmed kids and then drove off. Reporter: One witness remembering Dunn's aggressive words. You're not going to talk to me that way. Reporter: Another recalling the last moments of Jordan Davis' life. I pulled up to the car. There was a young man that had been hit. I checked for a pulse. Reporter: But the defense telling a different story claiming that Jordan Davis with three other teens in this red SUV intimidated Dunn for asking them to turn down their music. You're dead, . 24 is going down now with a shotgun barrel sticking out of the window or a lead pipe, whatever it was, a deadly weapon. Reporter: Police found no weapons but they challenged this grilling witnesses about whether they knew if Davis was armed. Are you focusing at all on the SUV? No, sir. Were you even looking in that direction? No, sir. Reporter: He pleaded not guilty. Davis' parents in the courtroom yesterday must deal with the death of their son all over again. This is the first time they've heard the gunshots when they played the convenience store video. I imagine this is just a parents' worst nightmare. Reporter: And more witnesses may take the stand today to talk about what they saw and heard that night and the jury in this case will be sequestered throughout the trial. George? ING 0, Ryan, thanks. Let's talk to Dan Abrams and this case coming into focus and it's not a stand your ground case. Let's just put that off the table for a minute. There's no issue about the duty to retreat. There's no hearing before the trial to try to get it dismissed this. Is classic self-defense. He is saying he reasonably believed that he was in danger of for his safety or his life. That eyewitness we saw right there undercutting that claim. Oh, that's a crucial witness. I mean, if he is saying as this eyewitness said, you know, you're not going to talk to me that way. That's not self-defense, that's rage, that's anger and that's a big problem for the defense. And the defense does have this theory, no gun was found on the scene with teenagers but they have some kind of a theory that the teens had a gun and then ditched it. The defense needs there to be a gun. Without a gun it is hard to see how this defense prives here meaning, again, what was reasonably going through his mind, so he says it was either a gun or some sort of stick or something like that that was threatening him. Now, the only evidence I think we're going to hear in this case about that is going to be either from him, the interviews or him on the stand. That's what I was going to get to. If this is all about what's going on in his head he'll have to testify. Or they can use his police statements. I think he has to get on the stand. This is not an easy defense or a George Zimmerman case where there was an injury on the back of his head. This was a totally different case and I think he'll have to get up there and explain what he says happened, most importantly, what was going through his head at that moment without that, I don't see how they succeed. We'll be watching. Dan Abrams, thanks very much. We certainly will. Now to the search for a

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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