Tourette's Patient's 'Bomb' Tick Get's Him Kicked off Flight

Michael Doyle suffers from Tourette's Syndrome, causing him to uncontrollably say, "bomb."
2:40 | 04/29/13

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Transcript for Tourette's Patient's 'Bomb' Tick Get's Him Kicked off Flight
A story about a young man who suffers from tourette's syndrome, forbidden by jet blue from flying with them because he couldn't stop saying the word bomb. Reporter: This case raises a lot of questions. A young man doing everything he can to explain behavior ahead of time but still being denied access to a flight he planned for two years. With when 19-year-old michael doyle arrived, he was worried. I was telling myself many my head before, don't say bomb. When you try to suppress tourette's it comes out worse. Reporter: And it did. Those are tourette's often can't control verbal tics. Through security, at the gates, michael, uncontrollably blurted out what can be a frightening word these days. I probably said bomb, bomb, about -- 100 times in that terminal. And through tsa. Reporter: Traveling with FRIENDS TO AN 18thRY Battle reenactment, doyle had planned ahead, carrying documentation. In the boarding area, the pilot heard him say "bomb" and refused to allow the young man on the flight. His friends stayed with him. It's very frustrating after three hours of sitting there. And two years planning. Doesn't happen. Reporter: Frustrating, but also a sign of the times? Tensions are high. People are worried. They know that there have been terrorist attacks. At the end of the day, the pilot in chand has the decision of who gets on the plane and who doesn't. Reporter: Jet blue says after furtherer investigation, the situation was deemed to be innocuo innocuous. But no guarantee he'll be able to board a future flight. It does not make me want to fly at all. Reporter: You could hear him with theic when e said bomb in the piece. He stayed home. So did his friends. This will start a discussion in the aviation industry. How do you handle this? The pilot is the one with the final say, no matter what. You can't blame the pilot. You wish they would have found another way around it. He did everything he could. Giving them the documentation. Letting them know. He let it be known. He let it be known. Let him fly. What do you think at home? Tell us at goodmorningamerica.Com right now. Lots more ahead. A young mom missing.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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