White House faces fallout on reported Comey memo

ABC News' Dan Abrams and Jon Karl report on the legal and political implications of President Trump's alleged request to James Comey to drop the investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn.
2:39 | 05/17/17

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Transcript for White House faces fallout on reported Comey memo
And so many questions and hope some answers from our chief legal analyst Dan Abrams and Jon Karl. Could this be obstruction of justice? Sure, it could be. Can the legal definition be fit here as to attempting to influence an ongoing procedure or investigation? Sure. But it's going to come down to what was the intent? Meaning when he said I hope, was that just talk or was that a sort of a wink and nod with an instruction as to what to do? No question this wasn't a good idea for president trump no matter what you think and the fact that two of his key aides were instructed to leave the room right before he has this conversation, the vice president and the attorney general doesn't help in trying to determine what the intent is but most importantly remember look to the political. When we're talking about impeachment it's not about the definition of the statute it's about the fact that Fox News at 6:00 last night couldn't get a single Republican to come on to defend Donald Trump. That should be a bigger concern than the legal statue. Because what would it take for an indictment? For a sitting president most believe impeachment is the way that you would prosecute someone. Could you later prosecute them criminally, sure but that the first step here would be an impeachment proceeding and that is a political proceeding. That's in front of the congress and the senate so as we discussed this, I can't emphasize enough look to the Republican senators and congressmen, congresspeople because that's going to be much more important than legal experts defining the statute. Let's bring in Jon Karl for more. Jon, Dan makes the point basically an impeachable offense, whatever the majority in congress decides. We are starting to see Republicans start to crack or at minimum go silent. Reporter: Absolutely, and you're seeing some very key Republicans raise questions. The chairman of the senate intelligence committee, the chairman of the senate judiciary committee, the chairman of the house oversight committee, those are committees that would be investigating this, those are committees that would be in our calling James Comey calling him to testify threatening to subpoena that memo if possible. You saw that from Jason Chaffetz. It is clear Republicans at the very least are nervous about what they are seeing, are demanding answers and are in no way running to the microphones to defend their Republican president. Jon, we heard from congressman Schiff. I guess we'll find out whether president trump has those tapes, as well. Reporter: Absolutely and the thing about this, it was president trump that first invoked that. James Comey better hope there are no tapes of our conversation. It turns out that Comey himself had something very close to tapes, con temp andous notes of those conversations.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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