Govt. Panel Scuttles Prostate Cancer Testing Recommendations

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Still others said that the decision needed to be made on a case-by-case basis.

"I agree that screening for prostate cancer in men in general is a bad idea," said Dr. John Messmer, associate professor of family and community medicine at Penn State Hershey College of Medicine. "That being said, the possibility of obtaining a PSA on a man with particular circumstances should still be an option."

As for the millions of middle-aged and older men who find themselves in the middle of this debate, the consensus among the physicians is for them to communicate openly with their doctors.

"This does not preclude a patient from asking for the test and the physician offering the test," said LeFevre. "There should be an open and honest discussion with significant known harms."

And while the USPSTF's recommendations may drastically reduce the number of men who undergo a PSA blood test, those considered to have a strong family history of prostate cancer -- in other words, more than one first degree relative with prostate cancer before the age of 69 -- may still want to consider getting it.

"The key is informed decision-making," said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society. "In the physician-patient relationship, men should be informed of the known risks and potential benefits and be encouraged to make a choice."

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