Doctors' Religion Tied to End-of-Life Care

Share
Copy

The religious beliefs of physicians who treat patients at the end of life appear to influence clinical decision-making, a British survey shows.

Physicians in the U.K. who reported being very or extremely religious were less likely to endorse certain end-of-life decisions, including continuous deep sedation and initiation of treatment that would be expected to shorten life, Clive Seale of Queen Mary, University of London, reported online in BMJ.

They were also less likely to report discussing such options with patients or to support the legalization of euthanasia.

Read this story on www.medpagetoday.com.

"One potential response to the findings about the influence of religious faith is to suggest, as others have done, that religious doctors disclose their moral objections to certain procedures to patients so that patients can choose other doctors if they wish," Seale wrote.

However, he continued, "It is equally plausible to argue that non-religious doctors should confess their predilections to their patients."

But regardless of religious faith, he concluded, "it would seem advisable that doctors become more aware of how broader sets of values, such as those associated with religiosity or a non-religious outlook, may enter into their decision-making in end-of-life care."

Past research suggests that a patients faith influences the type of care they request, but the ultimate outcome depends on a collaborative effort between both the patient and the doctor, according to Holly Prigerson, director of the center for psycho-oncology and palliative care research at Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Mass.

"Everyone talks so much about personalized medicine, and it's more than just genetic profiling and tailoring medicines," said Prigerson. "This study says personalized medicine means doctors are people too and their views strongly influence the care patients should get."

Seale mailed surveys to 8,857 British general practitioners, neurologists, elderly care specialists, palliative care specialists, and physicians from "other hospital" specialities; 42.1 percent responded.

Religion Influences Doctors' End-of-Life Decisions

Compared with respondents to the British Social Attitudes survey of the U.K. general population, the physician respondents were less likely to be Christian (51.6 percent versus 71.6 percent), but more likely to be Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish, or Muslim.

Although ethnicity was unrelated, in general, to end-of-life decision-making, degree of religiosity did appear to influence it.

According to the study, physicians who reported being religious were less willing to talk about what type of end of care decision they made for their patients.

"We all know how important it is to talk about the options with the patient or family in the options so they can have a realistic appreciation of what's available and what's provided," said Prigerson. "There is a problem with the lack of willingness to discuss it."

In further analyses, physicians who reported being very or extremely non-religious reported higher rates of using continuous deep sedation, making a decision involving some intention to hasten the end of life, and supporting the legalization of euthanasia compared with those who held strong religious beliefs.

Non-religious physicians also were more likely to report having discussions about treatments that were expected to shorten life.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
null
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: A home damaged by a landslide Friday, April 18, 2014 in Jackson, Wyo. is shown in this aerial image provided by Tributary Environmental.
Tributary Environmental/AP Photo
null
Danny Martindale/Getty Images
PHOTO: Woman who received lab-grown vagina says she now has normal life.
Metropolitan Autonomous University and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine