Report Warns of Student Injuries, Even Deaths, at the Hands of Teachers

"Teachers need to have the ability under clearly outlined protocol to restrain children," he said.

When asked about the possibility of abuse, Koocher told ABCNews.com that it is "a reasonable risk we have to take."

"We always have the danger that someone will over-respond to a situation," he said. "But there are students who legitimately post a threat to other students and the supervising adults and others have to able to restrain them under appropriate guidelines."

Stephanie Petska, the state director of special education in Wisconsin, said that she wants the policy to remain as is, where certain forms of restraint and seclusion are permitted only as a "last resort" for teachers who have tried more "positive interventions" first without success.

Some Parents Favor Restraining Students

Asked whether parents have ever expressed concern that teachers in Wisconsin may not be properly trained to know when it is appropriate to use restraint, Petska said that they have not. Petska says she has heard the opposite, parents who say that they're worried an outburst by another child may hurt their own kid.

"I have had conversations with parents who are worried about their child in a classroom with another child who might become violent," said Petska, who suggested that those parents who have "deep-seeded issues with the use of restraint" look into alternative learning environments. Petska said that the child's Individualized Education Program, which includes the parent, should work to determine "an appropriate program and placement" for the child.

But for one mother in upstate New York who asked that her name not be published, alternatives aren't always possible when it comes to special education.

"There was no other place for me to enroll my son," she said of her small, rural hometown. "I did worry about my son getting really hurt; it's very, very scary," she said. "This kind of restraint and seclusion is like a practice out of the dark ages."

But the National Disability Rights Network argues that every parent, even those who have not encountered restraint or seclusion first-hand, should be aware of what goes on behind the doors of their local schools.

"We try to capture in our report the little school down the street and the kids walking by your house," Curt Decker, the network's executive director, said.

"You don't know, there might be a seclusion room or some dreadful things happening in your neighborhood school."

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