Vermont, Hawaii Top Health Care Scorecard

Healthcare

Vermont leads the nation in the delivery of its health care, while Mississippi is rated the worst, according to a non-partisan study that compares all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Vermont, Hawaii, Iowa, Minnesota, Maine and New Hampshire ranked 1 to 5 in 38 indicators of health care.

At the bottom were Mississippi, along with Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nevada and Texas.

The Commonwealth Fund Commission's "Scorecard on Health System Performance," which was released today, rated the states on access, quality, costs and health outcomes in a follow up to their 2007 report.

Overall, the states which did best on the Commonwealth scorecard were in New England and the upper Midwest, and the worst states were in the South.

Vermont, with only 640,000 residents, has nearly universal health care coverage with 93 percent insured. Its innovative "Blue Print for Health" focuses on prevention of chronic diseases.

Click Here to Compare Health Care Quality State By State

"We're small. There are 19 cities larger than the state of Vermont," said Susan Besio, director for health care reform and Medicaid for Vermont.

"But I believe there is something unique about Vermont in terms of its culture," she told ABCNews.com. "We want to take care of each other and we are a healthy state."

In Mississippi, however, about 20 percent are uninsured despite having some of the highest rates of hypertension, diabetes and asthma.

According to the report, only 35.7 percent of adults 50 or over in Mississippi receive recommended screening and preventive care.

"When you compare Mississippi on almost any socio-economic profile, we are a struggling population that has a large percentage of low-income individuals, high unemployment rates, low rate of education," said Robert Pugh, director of the Mississippi Primary Health Care Association.

The scorecard "paints a picture of health care systems under stress, with deteriorating health insurance coverage for adults and rising health care costs," according to co-author Cathy Schoen, who is senior vice president of the commission.

"Where you live matters for access, quality of care and whether you live a long and healthy life," she told ABCNews.com. "These wide and persistent gaps among states highlight the need for national reforms and federal action to support states."

For example, 32 percent of working-age adults in Texas are uninsured, compared to only 7 percent in Massachusetts in the most recent survey.

"It's very hard to have a high performing health care system and hospitals that do well for everyone if you have a high rate of uninsured in the state," said Schoen.

In 1999-00, there were only two states with 23 percent or more of adults uninsured. But by 2007-2008 there were nine.

Children fared much better, due in large part to the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) under Medicaid. The number of states with 16 percent or more of children uninsured dropped from nine to three during the same time period.

Other findings of the report were that in a, costs rose and quality improved in areas where outcomes were reported to the public.

Vermont's 'Blue Print For Health' A Model

The Green Mountain state was cited for its model "Blue Print" program. Launched by Republican Gov. Jim Douglas, it covers everything from teaching children healthy eating to helping seniors stay in their homes rather than going to costly nursing homes.

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