Medical Mystery: The Baby Who Wouldn't Grow

Ruzman said that since this episode, she has laid Suraya to sleep on a special mat that monitors her breathing in case more seizures occur at night.

While terrifying for her mother, Suraya's seizures may offer more clues as to what may be behind her mysterious condition. Holzman said her hypoglycemia may point to a metabolic disorder -- though these can be difficult to diagnose.

A genetic abnormality may also be a factor. "The fact that she was small at birth suggests a genetic disease that might have a very small deletion or duplication of a part of a chromosome," Holzman said. "These can be hard to identify and require sophisticated chromosome studies."

Cole agreed that the fact that Suraya was so small at birth is an important clue.

"If this weight is correct, she was strikingly small at birth -- a condition known as intrauterine growth retardation," he said. "This observation means that the substances needed to grow in the womb were also disrupted."

He said one possibility may be a genetic defect that makes it impossible for the infant's body to respond to the hormone known as insulin, which is critical in the body's ability to properly regulate blood sugar and certain aspects of growth and development.

Baby Suraya Still Full of Surprises

Though Suraya's life has had a difficult start, Ruzman said that her tiny daughter remains cheerful.

"She's such a happy baby; she's a cheeky monkey," she said. "That child is intelligent, and she knows what's going on around her."

Suraya's parents, however, continue to worry about what the future holds for their youngest child. Ruzman said the family's medical consultant told her it could take years before doctors find an explanation for her daughter's condition -- or the answer may never come.

"All we want to know is what we will have in the future for her -- will she be in pain? What will she have to eat? Will the length of her life be different?" Ruzman said. "We just want to give her the best quality of life."

In an effort to answer these questions, doctors have now admitted Suraya to London's Great Ormond Street Hospital, where she will undergo further tests. And Wednesday, doctors will operate on Suraya to determine whether any throat abnormalities could be contributing to her condition.

Ruzman said the hunt for answers has been difficult. But she added that her tiny daughter is worth the struggle.

"I wouldn't change her for the world, neither would her dad," Ruzman said. "We know that this child is very special."

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