Saving Natalie: Family Launches International Search for Asian Donor

The reason for the disparity, Taylor said, is that the largest registries come out of the United States and Europe, mostly Caucasian countries. Vietnam, she said, doesn't even have one registry.

Africa, she said, by comparison, has just one for the entire continent and that's in South Africa.

Even within the U.S., it's difficult to find minority donors. It's a plight that was well-publicized in the case of 6-year-old Jasmina Anema, the leukemia-stricken New York City girl who inspired thousands of African-Americans to become donors.

Her cause was championed across the country and highlighted by celebrities such as Rihanna, who also became a donor after meeting Jasmina. A match was eventually found, but the cancer returned as her body attacked the new cells.

Though doctors have been careful to avoid discussing a prognosis for Natalie, instead focusing on possible treatments, her family knows how desperately a match is needed.

For Natalie's part, she has astounded her doctors with a constant curiosity about her illness and treatment.

"She's very curious, very smart," Kim said. And stuck in a hospital, "she's bored out of her mind."

Her family and friends will keep going until they find a match, something Taylor said happens only for four out of 10 people.

"I'm really moved by how many complete strangers are stepping up to the plate," Kim said. "She knows there are people she's never met working to help her."

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