Photo: Caroline Kilday, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Special Olympics

    Andy Roddick and 2010 Special Olympics USA National Games tennis competitor James Reiter, 46, of Toledo, Ohio, share a moment during the tennis clinic at the Ethel S. Abbott Sports Complex in Lincoln, Neb., July 18.
    Photo: Caroline Kilday, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Special Olympics

    Following comprehensive health care legislation passed earlier this year and on the eve of the 20th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act, a Special Olympics health symposium brought together the country's most renowned experts on health for people with intellectual disabilities, such as Dr. Gloria Krahn from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Dr. James Rimmer from the University of Chicago.
    Photo: Karl Hejlik, Special Olympics
  • Special Olympics

    More than 280 athletes will compete in aquatics. The athletes come from 44 states and will bring along 80 coaches. Some of the events include backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly, freestyle in both individual and team relays.
    Photo: Brittany Stark, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Special Olympics

    Jeff Brewer, 36, of Columbus, Ohio, practices his high-jump technique Sunday morning. Brewer will compete in five events this week in the 2010 Special Olympics USA National Games in Lincoln, Neb. Brewer will compete in the high jump, 100 meter dash, running long jump, the 4×100 meter relay and shot put.
    Photo: Kelly O'Malley, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Documentation Team
  • Special Olympics

    Doug Derby, 39, a member of the Nebraska White team, rests between warm-ups for his team's scrimmage game.
    Photo: Asha Anchan, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Special Olympics

    2010 Sports Illustrated cover model Brooklyn Decker, a national spokeswoman for the Special Olympics, emceed the opening ceremony for the 2010 Special Olympics USA National Games Sunday at the Devaney Sports Center in Lincoln, Neb.
    Photo: Farooq Baloch, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Special Olympics

    The Florida unified soccer team practices at the Ethel S. Abbott Sports Complex Sunday, July 18, 2010.
    Photo: Marcus Scheer, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Special Olympics

    Behind the scenes at the Opening ceremonies, athlete Jarod Markley extends a hug to South Dakota Development Director Darryl Nordquist.
    Photo: Amanda Schutz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Special Olympics

    Special Olympics athletes from Minnesota celebrate the opening of the USA National Games. More than 3,700 athletes from 47 states and 13,000 fans filled the the University of Nebraska's Bob Devaney Sports Complex for Opening Ceremonies.
    Photo: Karl Hejlik, Special Olympics
  • Special Olympics

    Dr. Richard Besser and his son, Jack, talk to Bill Fields, assistant vice president of Sports and Training for Special Olympics Southern California, as the state's athletes prepare to enter the University of Nebraska's Bob Devaney Sports Complex for Opening ceremonies.
    Photo: Karl Hejlik, Special Olympics
  • Special Olympics

    Team Alabama's 4×100 meter relay team practices handoffs Sunday for this week's 2010 Special Olympics USA National Games in Lincoln, Neb. Anthony White, 21, of Wilsonville, Ala., passes the relay baton to Aaron Lindsey, 44 (right), Mobile, Ala.
    Photo: Kelly O'Malley, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Documentation Team
  • Special Olympics

    A member of the 2010 Special Olympics USA National Games Torch Run Team lights the cauldron torch at the Devaney Sports Center in Lincoln, Neb. Sunday's opening ceremony for the 2010 Special Olympics USA Summer Games marked the official start of the games. The USA Summer Games run through Friday and include nearly 3,000 Special Olympics athletes from 49 states competing in 13 sporting venues.
    Photo: Farooq Baloch, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Special Olympics

    Tim Shriver, chairman and CEO of Special Olympics, spoke on the role of the Special Olympics in bridging the gap for those with intellectual disabilities. "We have a crisis in the health care system in this country that most people don't recognize." Shriver issued a challenge: Join the Special Olympics movement's fight to counter obesity, encourage physical fitness and increase access to health care.
    Photo: Karl Hejlik, Special Olympics
  • Special Olympics

    Actor Harrison Ford arrived in Lincoln, Neb., at about 3:30 in the afternoon, bringing in Special Olympic athletes from New Mexico. He addressed the media at about a half hour later, emphasizing the important role that general aviation plays in the Special Olympics community in terms of going the extra mile to get these athletes to their destinations.
    Photo: Special Olympics
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