Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    An Egyptian activist artist works on a mural depicting a rebel with an eye patch in Tahrir square, Cairo, Egypt, Sept. 30, 2012. A group of artists, photographers and a publisher have joined hands to preserve the revolutionary graffiti dating from the Jan. 25, 2011 uprising against then-President Hosni Mubarak.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    Graffiti on a newly whitewashed wall in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Sept. 21, 2012. Under cover of darkness, a few municipality workers quietly began to paint over an icon of Egypt's revolution: a giant, elaborate public mural on the street that saw some of the most violent clashes between protesters and police over the past two years.
    Khalil Hamra/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    Arabic wording on this mural says, "God, give me justice." It is shown at an art exhibition of street graffiti in Cairo, Oct. 4, 2012. Graffiti has been among the most powerful art forms and tools of Egypt's revolution, but it also has proven to be its most vulnerable and ephemeral.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    A political activist paints a mural on a wall in Tahrir Square in Cairo, May 24, 2012.
    Pete Muller/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    Newly painted graffiti reads in Arabic, "Erase more," on a wall that was whitewashed during a cleanup campaign to erase old murals in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Sept. 19, 2012. Graffiti artists began repainting the walls in Mohammed Mahmoud Street soon after municipal workers covered a mural depicting the faces of victims of police brutality.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    Mona Said, the owner of the art gallery hosting an exhibition of street graffiti, with some of the artifacts on display. Cairo, Oct. 4, 2012.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    An Egyptian man picks out a copy of the pictorial book "Wall Talk" that chronicles the revolution and its aftermath, at a publishing house in Cairo, Egypt. The newly released 680-page book collects hundreds of photos of graffiti dating from the beginning of the revolt against then-President Hosni Mubarak on Jan. 25, 2011 until today.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    An Egyptian street artist named Ghanzir walks by a mural with Arabic that reads, "The people are giving me a hard time," inside an art exhibition of street graffiti in Cairo, Egypt.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    An Egyptian artist works on a mural with faces depicting ousted Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak on a newly whitewashed wall in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Sept. 20, 2012.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    An Egyptian couple walks by a mural depicting military ruler Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi and ousted president Mubarak. Arabic wording reads, "Who assigned you did not die. No for gas export to Israel, the revolution continues," March 22, 2012.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    Young activists write graffiti on a wall in Tahrir Square in Cairo, May 24, 2012. During the uprising that resulted in the ouster of former President Hosni Mubarak in 2011, Tahrir Square was the central gathering point for protesters. Today, the square has largely returned to normal.
    Pete Muller/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    The graffiti on this wall shows a mother holding a picture of her son, who was killed during the revolution. Wording on the mural reads, "passed." Cairo, May 31, 2012.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    An Egyptian woman walks by a mural with Arabic that reads "no for harassing women," in Cairo, Egypt, Oct. 4, 2012.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
  • Egypt Revolutionary Graffiti Preserved in New Book

    Egyptian girls walk past a mural inspired by a widely circulated photo of Egyptian police beating and stripping a veiled female protester, on a recently whitewashed wall with Arabic that says, "We will not forget you, our lady," in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt, Oct. 4, 2012. Graffiti has been one of the most powerful art forms and tools of Egypt's revolution.
    Nasser Nasser/AP Photo
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