British Airways Jet's Engines Didn't Respond

The engines of a British Airways Boeing 777 didn't respond to a demand for an increase in thrust shortly before the plane crash-landed Thursday at London's Heathrow Airport, an initial investigation has concluded.

"At approximately 600 feet and two miles from touchdown, the Autothrottle demanded an increase in thrust from the two engines but the engines did not respond," the Air Accidents Investigation Branch said in a statement.

Thirteen people were injured when Flight 83 from Beijing came down well short of the southern runway; the 136 passengers were evacuated down the aircraft's emergency chutes.

"Following further demands for increased thrust from the Autothrottle, and subsequently the flight crew moving the throttle levers, the engines similarly failed to respond," the report stated.

The AAIB said the flight had been normal until the plane made its final approach for landing. One passenger suffered a serious injury.

It said the investigation would now focus on more detailed analysis of information from the flight recorder and other recorded information, and examination of "the range of aircraft systems" that could affect the engines.

The pilot of the British Airways plane that crash-landed at Heathrow received a hero's welcome from his colleagues today.

Applause rang out as Capt. Peter Burkill, 1st Officer John Coward and the head of cabin crew took to the podium at the British Airways-sponsored news conference.

Burkill explained that it was actually Coward "who was the handling pilot on the final approach, and did the most remarkable job."

Burkill also paid homage to the rest of his team, "Flying is about teamwork, and we had an outstanding team on board yesterday."

Burkill also singled out cabin service director Sharron Eaton-Mercer: "It was typical of her selflessness that she took time to check that we on the flight deck were all right before going down the chute herself."

On hearing these words, Eaton-Mercer became a little tearful.

Investigators continue to examine the Boeing 777.

Reuters contributed to this story.