The Next Bridal Party Trend: Flashing Your Panties?

PHOTO: The internet has been abuzz with a talk of a wedding trend in which the bridal party drops trou for photos.

It's traditional for a groom to drop down on one knee when proposing to his bride. But a series of photos circulating on the Internet are promoting a much cheekier wedding trend: bridesmaids dropping trou.

In a post on Elite Daily, writer Anthony Selden gathered a series of wedding photos in which a bridal party allegedly hiked up their dresses to expose their backsides to the camera. After receiving 286,000 likes on Facebook, many are asking whether the 2014 bridesmaid is now required to flash a little derriere.

But industry experts say the titillating portraits are likely old gags repackaged.

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"We aren’t calling this out as a trend," said Jamie Miles, editor of TheKnot.com. "Someone did this a long time ago and the photos have simply resurfaced. The reality is not that hundreds of brides are doing this. It is something that has picked up virality and spread online."

As the largest online wedding resource, The Knot's official stance on the photos is that they are a fashion "don't."

"We don’t recommend it," said Miles. "Fun cheeky photos like this are what the bachelorette party is for and usually are kept private. The wedding in general is a more serious event. We love that couples are getting fun and playful with their photos these days, adding in photoshopped dinosaurs or groomsmen wearing superhero tees underneath their tuxes. But in terms of showing your backside? We’re not behind that."

The Knot even went so far as to publish a blog post for its community offering "21 Reasons Why Getting 'Cheeky' in a Bridesmaid Photo Is a Bad Idea," suggesting that it may make bridesmaids feel awkward and that the photos may live on a Pinterest board long after the laughs have died down.

Fashion stylist Annie Lam echoed that sentiment.

"This new bridal party wedding picture trend kinda horrifies me," tweeted Lam. "Guess I just don't see the humor in it."

Miles also noted that some of the images spreading online may not be from real weddings.

"If you see these photos, clearly many of them are staged," she said. "They aren’t all authentic wedding photos. They may have been pulled from stock imagery or elsewhere."

Another site, Jezebel, alleges that some of the bawdy bridal photos seen on Elite Daily are stills that originated from a pornography set.

But other photos, such as those collected by a blogger on CollegeCandy, appear to have been taken directly from wedding photographers' websites, indicating that some brides are decidedly OK going au naturel.

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