'Wolf of Wall Street' Jordan Belfort's next chapter

Infamous former stockbroker, who served prison time for securities fraud and money laundering, is trying to rebrand as a self-help guru.
5:51 | 09/30/17

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Transcript for 'Wolf of Wall Street' Jordan Belfort's next chapter
He is the money-making, drug-taking, car-crashing wolf of Wall Street. Jordan wbelford, made infamous on the big screen by Leonardo Dicaprio. I've been a rich man and I've been a poor man. And I choose rich every ING time. What kind of money were you making? A million a week, about. Reporter: He began his climb up the finance food chain as a stock broker in the 1980s, from penny stocks to multi-million dollar deals. I'm a born salesman. I have an ability naturally, from the first time I opened my mouth, to sell. The words came out perfectly. Reporter: Eventually running his own firm, Stratford oakmont. The cash fell like rain. His appetites exceeded his income. Voracious appetite to spend money, which I no longer have. On what? Sex, drugs recognition and roll. Houses, cars, boats. Dinners, wine, champagne. I don't even like champagne. Reporter: Living the life of stereotypical '80s Wall Street excess, think Gordon gekko. Greed, for lack of a better word, is good. Reporter: With wilder parties. I think it's about money, first. But certainly about sex and drugs. It was an alternative universe. People having sex under their desks in coat closets, everyone, drugs lining the pockets of the brokers. Reporter: Belford his meteoric rise for the rich and shameless was headed to are a crash landing but he was stoned to notice or care. What was your drug of choice? Quaaludes to start. Cocaine. Then everything after that. I won't blame the mistakes I made on drugs. I would say the drugs quieted down my guilt and remorse. Reporter: He didn't so much hit rock bottom, the rock rhit him. 1998 indicted for securities fraud and money laundering. The government says his firm defrauded investors of over $200 million. The money to Switzerland. The Swiss banker got arrested here. He gave everybody up and I was one of them. Reporter: He's serve 22 months if prison. How much money are we talking about? Good question. I don't know. The federal government says it was about $110 million. Yeah. Reporter: His list of victims is long. Come here, buddy. Reporter: More than 1,500 people. On that list, Bob sheran lost $250,000. First investment I think was $11,000, I made a couple thousand on it. The next one I made $1,500. Took me probably three or four rounds for me to fully figure out that this is just nonsense. Reporter: Now nearly two decades later -- I had bankrupt upside down values. Reporter: Belford trading on his notoriety, rebranding himself as the self-help guru, teaching people how to sell anything without breaking the law. Are you the new Tony Robbins, Oprah Winfrey, Joel Osteen? That's not who I am. My gift is to essentially take any person, to make them to be the best version of themselves. Reporter: He's written "Way of the wolf." Hes very advising average folks to legally and ethically make money. This book will help thousands of millions, hopefully millions of people. The system has helped millions of people all over the world. Millions? That's a big number. I wouldn't say it before the internet days. But you know how many people watch my videos? Tens of millions. Tens of millions. Reporter: 20 years may have helped redirect his moral compass but not his ego. I need some music in the background. Reporter: All these years later, belfort is neither modest nor apologetic, irking his critics and those bilked out of money. You read about people who lost their life savings, had nervous breakdowns, their lives were ruined. It's very annoying when he tries to excuse his behavior with, these were people that could afford the loss. What do you say to those people who you owe money to, who are angry? Many people claim that what you did ruined their life. I don't think many people claim that. I'd be surprised I destroyed someone's life, okay? If it did, that's terrible, I'm sorry. Reporter: At the time of his sentencing, belfort was ordered to pay over $110 million in restitution. But as of 2013, prosecutors say he'd only paid $11.6 million, about a dime on every stolen dollar, numbers belfort disputes. Those who say, why is he living as well as he is and he still owes these people? How should be I be living, in the gutter. Reporter: He isn't, he lives here with his partner Ann. We went through the rough stuff in the beginning. It's all smooth sailing from here on out. Exactly, the bad stuff out of the way the first two years. Reporter: For her it was hard to reconcile the wolf of wall Street with the man she loves. I was a bad guy, I made mistakes, no doubt about it. He is one of the most brilliant people anyone could ever meet. And with that brilliance comes a sensitivity that I don't think people realize you have. Reporter: These days belfort spends a good amount of time playing tennis. How would you describe his game? Counterpuncher with a dangerous forehand. Reporter: A passion he was able to indulge while in prison. One of these club med prisons you hear about? You know -- in some respects, yes. I mean, it wasn't, you know -- you don't have to be scared to be in the shower, right? But it's jail. At one place there was tennis courts. It's a good life. It's quiet. Reporter: Jordan belfort says he hopes his second act with make for a positive contribution to society. 55, seemingly wiser, yet still a wolf. Good or bad, once a wolf, always a wolf, flight. Hopefully a benevolent wolf. You know?

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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