White-Collar Wives: What It's Like to Lose It All

"It's really -- it can be scary, it can be -- it's difficult, it's painful," Leslie Scrushy said. "My husband was found guilty. And in that moment, it's just, how could this be happening? ... One of the most difficult things is people thinking that you are something that you are not."

Their life literally went on the auction block: furniture, boats, priceless artwork, all sold to the highest bidder. But perhaps even more painful was the social backlash. Friends turned their backs. The Scrushys were even asked to leave a function at their own church.

"There would be things written about me that would be very untrue," said Leslie Scrushy. "There are people that rejoice at our suffering. That's painful. There's some knowledge that was gained there. ... It's been a benefit, when you lose it all, to find out really the truth about who your friends are."

For Leslie it was a huge challenge. But even though it would have been easier to walk away from her husband, she didn't. She says she'd live through it all again because of what she learned in the process.

"I want to say that the money made me happy, but it didn't," she said. "If you were to go and ask me what's the most horrific part of all this, it's not having our family together. ... I do know that I have a wealth of information about a whole lot of stuff that I didn't know seven years ago."

Leslie uprooted their children from Birmingham to Beaumont to be closer to their father.

Now the visiting room at the federal correctional complex in Beaumont has basically become their family room. Scrushy and her kids try their best to make it feel like home.

"It's where we have our family time," she said. "They have this salad you can order -- well, buy, from the vending machine. And so I'll fix it up for Richard and crunch up some Fritos and cheese chips and make those the croutons and cook for my husband."

It might be vending machine food, but for Leslie and her kids, it's the new reality of family dinner.

"I will forever look back on this time -- would I have chosen it? No," said Scrushy. "But if I had to take it all away and say OK, you can go back to the faith you had before you started this whole process. But you get everything back -- you get your reputation back, you get your fake friends back, you get it all back, would you go back there if life could be dandy and fabulous? ... I would rather stay right here facing everything that I'm facing, separated from my husband, not knowing when it's going to change, and know what I know about God now."

'How Could You Do This?

Unlike Leslie Scrushy, Karen Weinreb said she feels bitter toward her convict husband. But like Scrushy, Weinreb is grateful for the way her fall from grace changed her outlook.

Weinreb said that originally it was the seduction of wealth that fooled her.

"Meeting my husband was like my Prince Charming had come into my life," she told ABC News. "Anywhere we wanted to go we could go. There was no limit on it. We went to the Caribbean, and if we didn't want to shop on Madison Avenue, we flew over to Milan to buy our clothes."

Karen and her husband, David, lived in Bedford, N.Y., an affluent suburb that is also home to Ralph Lauren, Chevy Chase and Martha Stewart. Karen, a graduate of Yale and Oxford, never knew or asked how David, a Bloomberg salesman and hedge-fund manager, was getting so rich.

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