Al-Qaida may be looking to avenge bin Laden's death, says Obama spokesman

The White House warned Thursday that al-Qaida affiliates still hunger to strike inside the United States, possibly to avenge Osama bin Laden's death, but said there was "no credible evidence" of an active plot timed for the anniversary of the al-Qaida leader's slaying by elite American forces.

President Barack Obama met with top national security advisers to gauge the prospects that extremist groups might be looking to attack the United States one year after the May 2, 2011, raid, spokesman Jay Carney told reporters at his daily briefing.

"At this time, we have no credible information that terrorist organizations, including al-Qaeda, are plotting attacks in the U.S. to coincide with the anniversary of bin Laden's death," Carney said in a prepared statement. "However, we assess that AQ affiliates and allies remain intent on conducting attacks on the homeland, possibly to avenge the death of bin Laden, but not necessarily tied to the anniversary."

U.S. forces killed bin Laden in a surprise attack on his compound in the Pakistani garrison city of Abbottabad, ending a decade-long manhunt for the mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The secret strike, which came on May 2 in Pakistan and May 1 in the United States, drew public expressions of anger in Islamabad, which described the attack as a violation of its sovereignty. American officials, meanwhile, have charged that some in Pakistan's government had to have known where bin Laden was hiding.

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