Hillary Clinton Sharpens Attacks on Bernie Sanders, 'Worried' About His 'Revolution'

PHOTO: Hillary Clinton stands on stage at the Battle Born Battleground First in the West Caucus Dinner, Jan. 6, 2016, in Las Vegas. Senator Bernie Sanders is a guest on Good Morning America, Jan. 6, 2016.John Locher/AP Photo/Fred Lee/ABC/Getty Images
Hillary Clinton stands on stage at the Battle Born Battleground First in the West Caucus Dinner, Jan. 6, 2016, in Las Vegas. Senator Bernie Sanders is a guest on 'Good Morning America,' Jan. 6, 2016.

A day after Hillary Clinton called for a "spirited debate" with Bernie Sanders, Clinton sharpened her attacks in Iowa today just as a new poll was released showing the Vermont senator ahead in the Hawkeye State.

Discussing their differences on health care, guns and Wall Street, Clinton said "now if that’s the kind of revolution he is talking about, I am worried folks."

During the event in Ames in which Clinton was endorsed by the Brady Campaign, Clinton called Sanders out for voting against the Brady Bill five times.

"You [Bernie Sanders] voted for what the NRA said was the biggest NRA priority giving them immunity, and he says, 'Well, I’m from Vermont.' Pat Leahy, the other senator from Vermont, voted against immunity for the gun lobby, so no, that’s not an explanation," Clinton said today.

Clinton went on to say how she’s fought Wall Street and how, while in the senate, she stood against Bush’s effort in his second term to privatize social security.

“I was one of the leaders in the efforts to prevent that from happening. So, don’t talk to me about standing up to corporate interests and big powers. I’ve got the scars to show for it and I am proud of every single one of them,” Clinton said.

Just as Clinton was addressing supporters at Iowa State University, a Quinnipiac University poll of likely Democratic Caucus-goers was released showing Sanders with a slight lead over Clinton 20 days from the caucus. Sanders sits at 49 percent to Clinton's 44 percent, marking this as Sanders' first lead in the state and Clinton's lowest support in Iowa since late August.

"You know we’re getting into that period before the caucus that I kinda call the let’s get real period," Clinton said. "Everyone’s been out there, lots of good energy, and I love it. ... But we do have differences. I think it's time and very important for everyone to understand what those differences are."

The former secretary of state also hit Sanders on how he's going to pay for his proposals as his campaign has said they will lay that out before the Feb. 1 caucuses. During her remarks, it was clear Clinton wasn’t solely talking about the prospect of a Republican in the White House -- but the possibility of a strong rival for the Democratic nomination.

"You gotta be able to defend it, and you have to withstand the barrage of attacks that will come against our democratic nominee. I am still standing," Clinton said.