Michigan Recount Process to Resume Next Week After Brief Halt

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After a brief halt, the vote recount in Michigan will continue next week despite the efforts of Donald Trump's representatives to prevent it, officials announced today.

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"The State Board of Canvassers today did not accept an objection from representatives of Donald J. Trump regarding the presidential election recount that was requested by Green Party nominee Jill Stein," a statement released by Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson's office read.

Recount activity in Michigan was halted on Thursday when the state's election board "received an objection from representatives of Donald J. Trump," the Michigan Secretary of State's office said Thursday.

According to the secretary of state's office, the recount will resume next Wednesday. According to MLive, the board voted 2-2 in a meeting this morning and because a majority was not reached, the recount can continue as planned.

On Monday, the Michigan Board of State Canvassers certified Trump as the winner of presidential election in Michigan. The Great Lake State was the last to be called in the election.

Stein has raised millions to request vote recounts in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania as well, and she has already paid for a recount in Wisconsin, which is currently underway.

If there is excess money from their fundraising, Stein's team said the campaign will consult with the Federal Election Commission guidelines on how best to proceed.

In a statement released Wednesday, Johnson said that recount efforts could cost Michigan taxpayers millions.

“It is unusual that a candidate who received just 1 percent of the vote is seeking a recount, especially when there is no evidence of hacking or fraud, or even a credible allegation of any tampering," the statement read. “The cost of this recount to Michigan taxpayers could easily reach into the millions of dollars. Based on Wisconsin’s estimate, Michigan taxpayers could be paying $4 million despite the $1 million the Green Party nominee must pay to have the recount."

The statement continued: “Nevertheless, county clerks have been gearing up to complete this recount under a very challenging deadline. They’ll be working nights and weekends. I know they will do a great job because we have some of the best clerks in the country here in Michigan.”

ABC News' Meghan Keneally and Ryan Struyk contributed to this report.

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