'This Week' Transcript: Gov. Rick Perry and Stephen Colbert

COLBERT: George, see, you're pushing me into being a candidate.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Time is running short.

COLBERT: I'm in an exploratory phase right now. I'm still putting together my exploratory committee. And I'm looking -- would you be willing to be on my exploratory committee?

STEPHANOPOULOS: No, I cannot be on your exploratory committee, nor would I be willing to...

COLBERT: Why can you not be on my exploratory committee?

STEPHANOPOULOS: ...to run for vice president. But who are you looking at for vice president?

COLBERT: Well, I -- George, I certainly -- I'm looking at myself right now. You know, I read The New York Times last week that there are three Stephen Colberts, one of those two other guys might be a good vice presidential candidate. If I'm running, and I'm not...

STEPHANOPOULOS: You have to be born in two different states, according to the Constitution.

COLBERT: Really? Well, I was born in Washington, D.C., which isn't a state at all. So I think I've got it covered all around.

STEPHANOPOULOS: The second question from Facebook comes from Sharon Smith, it reads...

COLBERT: I love that Facebook. That thing is growing.

STEPHANOPOULOS: They are. "How does Mrs. Colbert feel about the possibility of having her husband run for president?"

COLBERT: Mrs. Colbert isn't on the exploratory committee. And, I think she's probably going to find out about it by watching the show today.

So, honey, we might be running for president, sorry about that. I should have told you before I came on air.

STEPHANOPOULOS: What is your guess on how she feels about it?

COLBERT: She would make a fantastic first lady of South Carolina.

STEPHANOPOULOS: OK. Finally, Wanda Renee...

COLBERT: Wanda Renee?

STEPHANOPOULOS: Wanda Renee.

COLBERT: I know Wanda, she's a good woman.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Also on Facebook...

COLBERT: Really? Do you get your questions from anywhere but Facebook?

STEPHANOPOULOS: No, we got a few of them from Facebook, though. "Do you believe the outcome of the 2012 presidential election is based on how much money each candidate can raise?"

COLBERT: No, it's how much speech they can express, because money equals speech. It doesn't matter if the speech comes from money or comes from your mouth.

STEPHANOPOULOS: So you agree with the Supreme Court?

COLBERT: On almost everything. Money equals speech, therefore, the more money you have the more you can speak. That's just -- that just stands to reason. If corporations are people, corporations should be able to speak. That's why I believe in super PACs.

STEPHANOPOULOS: So you believe in super PACs. You believe they're full expression of the First Amendment?

COLBERT: Without a doubt, do you not, George? Do you not believe that some -- are you saying...

STEPHANOPOULOS: I'm asking the questions today, Mr. Colbert.

COLBERT: Well, you answer one of my questions, I'll answer one of yours. Do you believe that corporations are people?

STEPHANOPOULOS: I'm not going to weigh in on that. We're going to have a long campaign here. But I want to know what you think about that.

COLBERT: Really? Corporations are people. You won't weigh in on whether some people are people. That seems kind of racist, George.

(LAUGHTER)

STEPHANOPOULOS: I am going to move on because one of your top supporters...

COLBERT: Really, I bet you will.

Page
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: Year In Pictures
Damien Meyer/AFP/Getty Images
PHOTO: James Franco and Seth Rogen in The Interview.
Ed Araquel/Sony/Columbia Pictures/AP Photo
PHOTO: Patrick Crawford is pictured in this photo from his Facebook page.
Meteorologist Patrick Crawford KCEN/Facebook
PHOTO: George Stinney Jr., the youngest person ever executed in South Carolina, in 1944, is seen in this undated file photo.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History/AP Photo