Sizing up the Preakness field

It came as little surprise that California Chrome was installed as the 3-5 favorite for Saturday's Preakness Stakes. The horse has literally done nothing wrong this year, and on paper, the race should be even easier than his victory in the Kentucky Derby.

What has provided a bit of drama, though, is the horses that will run against him.

Although 18 other horses lined up against California Chrome in the Run for the Roses, only two of them -- Ride On Curlin and General a Rod -- are willing to try again in the second jewel of the Triple Crown. That alone speaks volumes.

The thing is, California Chrome has answered every question asked of him this spring. He has won five races in a row by a combined 26 lengths, and given his performance in the Kentucky Derby, there is no reason to think he shouldn't handle everything that will be thrown at him in the Preakness.

The horse should win. It is that simple.

The Triple Crown does funny things to owners, and the chance to run in one of America's classic races leads to interesting decisions. Perhaps the most surprising entry was that of the filly Ria Antonia.

However, it wouldn't be a major sporting event if everyone didn't argue about various ways California Chrome could lose. The pace might not set up for him. Some less-seasoned horses might be freaks that just haven't had a chance to let their flags fly yet. Mars could start to orbit Venus.

Through all the speculation, trainer Art Sherman has remained positive, and who can blame him?

"My horse is kind of push-button," he said. "People don't know that he's got enough lick that he can stay with any horse in the race. He likes a target to run at, and I know that [jockey] Victor [Espinoza] is going to ride him well."

Of course, the Triple Crown does funny things to owners, and the chance to run in one of America's classic races leads to interesting decisions. Perhaps the most surprising entry was that of the filly Ria Antonia.

Normally, I'm actually all for the girls taking on the boys. It is not nearly as unusual in the rest of the world as it is here. But usually it is a filly that has proved she deserves the chance.

Ria Antonia has crossed the wire first once in her life, and that was a maiden special weight contest last July. She then won the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies last November through a controversial disqualification. As a 3-year-old, she has not tasted victory and comes into the Preakness off a sixth-place finish in the Kentucky Oaks. She has also been moved from trainer to trainer to fit her connection's whims.

In other words, odds are, Rachel Alexandra she is not. However, she met the qualifications to enter, so she is free to run.

"We're very happy with what we're trying to do," said owner Ron Paolucci. "We've always wanted to run in this race. She's a very big filly and very sound. The fact that she's coming back in two weeks gives her an absolute edge."

Paolucci was not the only owner who had interesting comments to make after the post position draw. Ron Sanchez owns Social Inclusion, who was installed as the second choice at 5-1. The colt finished third in the Wood Memorial last time out after winning his first two starts by 17½ lengths, and he is expected to be a strong pace factor.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...