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"I think the major accomplishment is that typical piezoelectric nanowires can produce about 30 milli volts," said Liwei Lin, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, who also does piezoelectric research. "This time [Wang] actually got a huge output."

Lin's work is in creating single piezoelectric nanowires much longer than Wang's, long enough to be woven into clothing. It will likely be three to five years before either Wang's or Lin's work will be found in a commercial product, but the Lin notes that piezoelectrics has made tremendous progress during the last few years, much of it led by Wang. The next few years will be even more exciting.

"My prediction is that in the next few years you will see commercial products," said Lin.

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