Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    To mark Earth Day, the <a href="http://www.worldwildlife.org/" target="external">World Wildlife Fund</a> released a <a href="http://www.worldwildlife.org/who/media/press/2010/WWFPresitem16011.html?intcmp=284" target="external">report</a> listing 123 new species discovered on the island of Borneo over the past three years. One of them, shown here, is Kopstein's bronzeback snake (Dendrelaphis kopsteini). The multi-colored snake can grow to 4.9 feet and was discovered in 2007.
    Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    This giant insect is more than 22 inches long and was first described in 2008. Known as "Chan's megastick," after the scientist who donated a specimen to the Natural History Museum in London. It is believed to be the world's longest insect.
    Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    The Bornean flat-headed frog shown here was first discovered in 1978, but it wasn't until 2008 that scientists discovered its most amazing feature: It doesn't have lungs. Instead, the frog breathes entirely through its skin.
    Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    This zebra-striped fish (Eirmotus insignis) was officially described in 2008. It measures about 1.4 inches and lives in slow-moving, shallow rainforest streams and swamps.
    Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    This reddish-brown ant (Lordomyrma reticulate) was described in 2008.
    Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    The tiny freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium kelianense) shown here was discovered in 2007 and is barely half an inch in length.
    Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    This unusual frog, commonly known as the Mulu flying frog, not only flies but changes color. Adults males are just 1.4 inches long and can glide thanks to large webbed feet. The flying frogs have bright green skin at night and brown skin during the day.
    Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    The "spectacled flowerpecker," shown here, was named because of the prominent rings around its eyes. Scientists say it rarely ventures below the canopy of the forest, which may be why the bird was only recently discovered.
    Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    Experts say that Borneo is unmatched in the number and diversity of orchids found there. About 3,000 species of orchid thrive in Borneo, including the new one (Thrixspermum erythrolomum) shown here.
    Courtesy WWF
  • WWF Releases List of New Species

    This green slug may not look like much, but scientists say the 1.6-inch critter uses so-called "love darts" in courtship. The "dart" is like a small harpoon, which the slug uses to inject a hormone into a mate. Scientists say this may increase the chances of reproduction.
    Courtesy WWF
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