Peeple App Lets You Rate Humans Like a Restaurant

PHOTO: Julia Cordray, the co-founder of Peeple, is pictured holding an iPhone with the Peeple App displayed on its screen in this undated file photo. Peeple/Facebook
Julia Cordray, the co-founder of Peeple, is pictured holding an iPhone with the Peeple App displayed on it's screen in this undated file photo.

This is the stuff nightmares are made of for the self-conscious.

Instead of telling someone how you feel face to face, a new app in beta called Peeple is unleashing the five-star rating and review system on humans. The app hasn't launched yet, but the founders say on their website the goal is to "change the way people can learn about each other online," whether it's looking at prospective roommates, dates or learning about a potential business partner.

Perhaps the most unnerving part of it all for some people: Anyone can add a new user and you can't remove your profile from the app.

The only item needed to add a person to the app is the user's cell phone number. They'll then receive a text message letting them know who started their profile.

A review works the same way it would on other platforms for restaurants and services. A person is given a rating of up to five stars and then the reviewer can leave a short message explaining their rationale.

Reviews two stars and below are sent to a user's inbox before being published, giving them 48 hours to work out the disagreement with a reviewer. If there is no resolution when the period expires, the review is then published and the person will have the chance to publicly defend him or herself against the feedback.

If a review is posted by someone a user does not know or includes bullying and other hateful content violating the app's terms and conditions, it will be removed. Peeple's creators say users will have to agree they are 21 and older before joining the app.

While the concept sounds scary, Peeple's creators are billing it as a "positivity app" and advise future users to use it how they would any other social network.

"Your network lifts you up and says positive things about you so that you can have a strong online reputation and get job opportunities, access to more networking opportunities with like-minded people, interact with other single people, and have the ability to search others to make better decisions around your greatest assets such as your family," the Peeple website says. "You can look up the character of the people you meet and interact with."

Peeple seems to be one of the first apps geared to the masses for rating people and having reviewers take ownership for their comments, while other apps have focused on anonymous reviews in more niche areas.

Knozen is a fun app letting users rate their co-worker's quirks, personality and work ethic by presenting users with photos of two colleagues and a question like, "Who is more likely to leave work early for a date?" or "Who is more likely to sing a song out loud?"

Another app called Lulu lets women research and review men, with reviews factoring into an average score of up to 10 points.