Boston Marathon Fatalities Include a Boy, a Woman and a BU Grad Student

PHOTO: Krystle Campbell, seen in this undated Facebook photo and Martin Richard, 8, are two of the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings, April 15, 2013.
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A Boston University graduate student was identified today as the third person to die from the terrorist bombing at the Boston marathon. The two other fatalities from the attack were identified earlier today as a boy and a young woman.

"The student was one of three friends who watched the race near the finish line," Boston University posted on its website. "Another of the three students, also a BU grad student, was injured and is in stable condition at Boston Medical Center."

The university did not release the student's name, pending permission from the family. The injured BU student underwent surgery and is recovering. The third BU student was unharmed.

COMPLETE COVERAGE: Boston Marathon Explosion

Earlier today Krystle Campbell, 29, joined Martin Richard, 8, as the two other fatalities identified from the Monday attack.

Campbell's parents William Campbell Jr. and Patty Campbell at first thought their daughter's friend had been killed, but later learned that it was their daughter who was the victim, according to ABC News' Boston affiliate WCVB.

The parents discovered their daughter was the one who had died when they were finally allowed to see the patient who had survived.

"I said, 'That's not my daughter. That's Karen! Where's my daughter?'" Patty Campbell told WCVB.

"My daughter was the most lovable girl. She helped everybody and I'm just so shocked right now. We're just devastated," William Campbell Jr. told Yahoo News. "She was a wonderful, wonderful girl. Always willing to lend a hand."

The parents are struggling to comprehend their loss.

"She didn't deserve this," Patty Campbell told WCVB. "She was a beautiful young being. She loved pets. She loved people."

Campbell told WCVB that her daughter worked 16-hour days in the food service industry.

"We can't believe it," the devastated mother said. "This is just a waste."

She said her daughter was at the race to cheer on a friend.

A sobbing Patty Campbell later made a brief statement from the family's porch: "We are heartbroken at the death of our daughter Krystle Marie. She was a wonderful person. Everybody loved her. She had a heart of gold and was always smiling. She worked hard in everything she did. You couldn't ask for a better daughter. This doesn't make any sense. "

The deaths of Campbell and Richard, who was from Dorchester, Mass., has left the country in mourning. The boy's mother and sister were also seriously wounded in the bombings.

Martin was remembered as a typical 8-year-old who loved to ride his bike and play baseball, according to a neighbor.

A single candle was placed in front of his home overnight in Dorchester, Mass.

"There are no words to describe how they are feeling ... we are feeling," neighbor Jane Sherman told WCVB, adding that the family is close-knit.

At least 145 people, including 10 children, were injured in the attack, according to the latest ABC News count. At least 17 people are in critical condition.

Dr. Vivek Shah was among those who provided on-site assistance He had just crossed the 26.2-mile finish line at the marathon Monday when he was forced to put his medical skills to work.

"I've never obviously been in combat, but people I've trained with have been and this is as close as I can imagine it would be," Shah told ABC News Radio late Monday night. "Just, basically piles of victims. Everything I saw was a traumatic amputation, basically."

Shah, an orthopedic surgeon at New England Baptist Hospital in Roxbury Crossing, Mass., said he saw injuries along the sidewalks on Boylston Street for which no amount of training could prepare him.

"In all my medical training, I have not seen things that I saw [Monday]. Everything was traumatic," Shah said.

Spectator Aaron Hern, 11, of Martinez, Calif., was another young victim injured when flying shrapnel dug into his thigh as he was waiting for his mother to cross the finish line. Hern is being treated at Boston Children's Hospital.

"He was waiting for his mom to go through the finish line to take pictures of her and shortly before she got there, the bomb went off," family friend Janene Sides told ABC News affiliate KGO-TV.

On Facebook, Aaron's mother, Katherine, said her son was in stable condition in the ICU late Monday night. Hern said Aaron would have additional surgeries and is expected to be hospitalized for seven to 10 days.

PHOTOS: Boston Marathon Explosions Near Finish Line

Hern's injuries are similar to what doctors at two Massachusetts hospitals described Monday night, hours after the explosions. Some of the most critical patients sustained lower extremity injuries from debris.

Dr. George Velmahos, chief of trauma at Massachusetts General Hospital, told a news conference today that patients were hit by what appeared to be shrapnel packed into the bombs, what he described as "Nails or sharp objects."

"I can't say for certainty, but that's what they look like. [They're] numerous… 10, 20, 30, 40 in their bodies, maybe more," Velmahos said.

Dr. Ron Walls, chair of emergency medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, said, "The most common serious injuries are combined lower extremity injuries."

Doctors have said they carried out several amputations.

RELATED: Knocked Down Marathoner Thought It Was His 'Last Trip'

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