Ron Haviv
  • "The Lost Rolls" is a newly-released photo book produced by award-winning photojournalist Ron Haviv. The book is comprised of 200 images from undeveloped rolls of analog film spanning over 20 years. These images were shot on secondary cameras that Haviv took with him on assignments as backup to his main camera. The film was not developed out of a lack of urgency and a need to save money. Eventually, these film canisters went into a pile that became forgotten until 2015 when Haviv started to develop them. Pictured, Pro Arafat rally in the West Bank, date unknown.
    Ron Haviv
  • The photos are from 1990 to around 2012 and the subjects on them vary from wars to world leaders to past girlfriends. In many instances Haviv found that personal images were mixed in with assignment work. This is the work of a legendary New York photographer and an inside look at the film that documented fragments of his life and those of history. Pictured, a funeral in Kosovo, 1998.
    Ron Haviv
  • The book had different meaning and purpose for Haviv. In a time when almost all photojournalists and hobby photographers are using digital cameras, analog film is becoming a dying medium. In part, Haviv says that this book is a kind of ode to the end of the analog era. Pictured, gang members arrested in San Salvador, El Salvador, 2005.
    Ron Haviv
  • Haviv discovered that he remembered some moments more intensely than others and he was surprised to find that some images contained faces and places that he could no longer remember. Haviv tells ABC News, "There were a number of images that I had remembered taking but could never find. The project helped complete incomplete memories. A panoramic image from the gangs in El Salvador was one such image." Pictured, a coup attempt in Moscow, 1993.
    Ron Haviv
  • "In terms of news images the few images from people fleeing war in Kosovo and living in the woods brought back intense memories of that conflict and what the people suffered. But it was seeing the images of two journalist friends who have since died that probably struck me the hardest. An image of the war correspondent Marie Colvin, who was one of the first to die in Syria and of my great friend and business partner [from Agency VII], the photographer Alexandra Boulat, were very difficult to see all of a sudden," Haviv said. Pictured, Photographer Alexandra Boulat in Spain, 2001.
    Ron Haviv
  • Protests in Northern Ireland are seen in this image from 2005.
    Ron Haviv
  • A girlfriend is pictured with the location and date unknown.
    Ron Haviv
  • Due to the nature of film and the degradation over time, Haviv discovered that the images now contained imperfect elements resulting in unique effects on the final images. Light leaks, mold, time and fog had caused streaks and color shifts on the final prints that added to a mysterious beauty that was overlaid onto history. Pictured, a funeral for Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in Jerusalem, 1995.
    Ron Haviv
  • In the following image the location and date are unknown. Haviv said to ABC News, "This is a surprising image in that I can’t remember being with these soldiers. I am assuming it is training as I would expect to remember being in battle with them. With some research I am sure I can deduce who they are based on the uniform and weapon. But in terms of immediate recognition-there is none."
    Ron Haviv
  • In this image the location and date are unknown. In "The Last Rolls" Haviv says, "This is perhaps the most universal all of the images found. Maybe it's of family, perhaps friends. I have no idea of time or place, nor who they are…this image is representative of what exists in many of our drawers and shoeboxes - tucked away and forgotten. We all have these caption-less moments of our lives that create more of a gap than they fill."
    Ron Haviv
  • In "The Last Rolls," certain images are paired with text describing the memory that the image incited. For the following image, Haviv says, "My first trip to Bosnia since the end of the war. Visiting places that I photographed in conflict, bridges replaced damaged footwalks, shell markings mended but visible, left me feeling that I wasn't sure whether peace had arrived or that people wanted it." This photo was captured in Sarajevo, Bosnia, in 2004.
    Ron Haviv
  • To learn more about "The Lost Rolls," visit, <a href="http://www.blurb.com/b/6554758-the-lost-rolls "external">http://www.blurb.com/b/6554758-the-lost-rolls </a> Pictured, a women appears in a photo found on one of Haviv's lost film rolls, date and location unknown.
    Ron Haviv
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