Courtesy Stone Lions Environmental Corporation
  • Carson Toxins

    Shell began operating its crude oil storage site in 1923. The three storage tanks, seen here in this aerial photo, supplied a nearby refinery. The facility was shut down and sold in 1966.
    Courtesy Stone Lions Environmental Corporation
  • Carson Toxins

    This aerial photo from 1966 shows the site of the former Shell storage facility shortly before it was sold to a developer that began putting homes up on the property two years later. The Carousel neighborhood is built on top of hundreds of thousands of gallons of crude oil that was left behind and buried under topsoil. Shell has stated they have received no data showing imminent health risks to the public.
    Courtesy City of Carson
  • Carson Toxins

    3.) Environmental experts digging at the Ravenna Avenue home of Lourdes and Dominic Piazza pulled up a slab of concrete covered in decades-old crude oil. The concrete is thought to be part of the storage tank walls.
    Sarah Netter/ABC News
  • Carson Toxins

    Environmental experts hired by law firm Girardi | Keese Lawyers, which represents hundreds of current and former Carousel residents in a massive lawsuit against Shell, collect samples from the ground that will be tested for toxins.
    Sarah Netter/ABC News
  • Carson Toxins

    Lourdes Piazza said she suffers from near daily migraines and has been treated for severe anemia and vertigo. Environmental tests show extremely high benzene levels under her property and Piazza believes that is to blame for her medical issues. Shell released a statement saying "data so far do not indicate any imminent health or safety risk to the public."
    Sarah Netter/ABC News
  • Carson Toxins

    While digging for evidence in the Piazza's front yard, experts pulled up a jar of ground water with oil floating on top.
    Sarah Netter/ABC News
  • Carson Toxins

    Royalene Fernandez, pictured with her husband Bernard Fernandez, is terminally ill. A resident of Carousel for 31 years, she was first diagnosed in 1992 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a type of cancer with increased risk of developing after prolonged exposure to benzene.
    Sarah Netter/ABC News
  • Carson Toxins

    Royalene and Bernard Fernandez, high school sweethearts, were among the first to buy a house in the Carousel neighborhood in 1968. They said they never told their house sat on top of an old crude oil storage tank.
    Courtesy Royalene Fernandez
  • Carson Toxins

    Royalene Fernandez and her two sons in the 1970s. Her youngest son loved his childhood neighborhood so much he bought his own house there in the 1990s. He still lives in Carousel.
    Courtesy Royalene Fernandez
  • Carson Toxins

    Adolfo Valdes, shown with his 3-year-old daughter Alexa, no longer allows his four daughters to play outside. Valdes said the entire family suffers from headaches, but can't afford to move.
    Sarah Netter/ABC News
  • Carson Toxins

    A plan of the Carousel neighborhood superimposed over a photo of the old storage site is marked to show the high levels of benzene. The highest levels, confirmed by Girardi Keese and the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board, were tested at 1,100 parts per million, more than 1,000 times the acceptable limit. Shell said in a statement it was the developer's responsibility to clean up the site before the houses were built.
    Courtesy Girardi | Keese Lawyers
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus