Richard Misrach. Fraenkel Gallery, Pace/MacGill Gallery, Marc Selwyn Fine Art
  • Richard Misrach, "Wall, east of Nogales, Arizona," 2015, from "Border Cantos" (Aperture, 2016).

    "Border Cantos" presents a unique collaboration between photographer Richard Misrach and composer and performer Guillermo Galindo. Misrach has been photographing the two-thousand mile border between the U.S. and Mexico since 2004, with increased focus since 2009—the latest installation in his ongoing series Desert Cantos, a multi-faceted approach to the study of place and man’s complex relationship to it. <a href="http://aperture.org/shop/border-cantos"target="external">"Border Cantos"</a> will be released by Aperture in March 2016.
    Richard Misrach. Fraenkel Gallery, Pace/MacGill Gallery, Marc Selwyn Fine Art
  • Richard Misrach, "Wall, near Brownsville, Texas," 2013, from "Border Cantos" (Aperture, 2016).

    Misrach and Galindo have been working together to create pieces that both document and transform the artifacts of migration. "I have been working in the American southwest for decades and was always aware that the border-the line in the sand-had major implications for the country. But I think the escalation of wall building and militarization in the last decade really caught my attention," Misrach told ABC News.
    Richard Misrach. Fraenkel Gallery, Pace/MacGill Gallery, Marc Selwyn Fine Art
  • Richard Misrach, "Border Patrol target range, Boca Chica Highway, near Gulf of Mexico," Texas, 2013, from "Border Cantos" (Aperture, 2016).

    Over the years, Misrach has shot over thirty chapters or "cantos" about the American desert west, with the idea that they would reveal a lot about who we are as a nation. "I have photographed military bombing ranges, space shuttle landings, man-made fires and floods, nuclear test sites, and so forth. The border is a crucial part of that story," Misrach told ABC News.
    Richard Misrach. Fraenkel Gallery, Pace/MacGill Gallery, Marc Selwyn Fine Art
  • Richard Misrach, "Tire drags used along the border from the Pacific Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico," 2013-15, from "Border Cantos" (Aperture, 2016).

    Misrach photographed the tires the border patrol drags along the 2000-mile border. By smoothing out the terrain, they are able to locate footprints and other signs of passage.
    Richard Misrach. Fraenkel Gallery, Pace/MacGill Gallery, Marc Selwyn Fine Art
  • Richard Misrach, "Agua #10, near Calexico, California," 2014, from "Border Cantos" (Aperture, 2016).

    Misrach's first photograph from the series was made in 2004, when he saw mysterious blue barrels with flags coming out of them and just the word "Agua" printed on them in remote areas of the desert. "It turns out they had been put out there by humanitarian groups so that migrants wouldn't die in the extreme heat," Misrach told ABC News.
    Richard Misrach. Fraenkel Gallery, Pace/MacGill Gallery, Marc Selwyn Fine Art
  • Richard Misrach, "Home using border fence as a fourth wall in Colonia Libertad, Tijuana, Mexico," 2014, from "Border Cantos" (Aperture, 2016).

    "In 2009, I started building the project in earnest and began a series of two-week trips all along the 2000 mile border, from the Pacific Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. I probably made 4-5 of those trips annually into 2015," said Misrach.
    Richard Misrach. Fraenkel Gallery, Pace/MacGill Gallery, Marc Selwyn Fine Art
  • Richard Misrach, "Effigy #2," near Jacumba, California, 2009, from "Border Cantos" (Aperture, 2016).

    "In 2009 I found a number of these effigies in the California desert. A local resident dressed agave stalks in discarded migrant clothing and stationed them in arroyos and canyons along the border. I don't know if they were made as "art", or as warnings for migrants or protests against the border patrol....but they haunted me," Misrach told ABC News.
    Richard Misrach. Fraenkel Gallery, Pace/MacGill Gallery, Marc Selwyn Fine Art
  • Guillermo Galindo, "Agujerado," 2015, from "Border Cantos" (Aperture, 2016).

    A few years after Misrach photographed the effigies, he saw Galindo perform a short "musical" piece that he composed on instruments he built from migrant belongings he found on the Texas border. "I was struck by the resonance of the found sculptures I had photographed and the sculpture/instruments that he had made," said Misrach. A collaboration was born. Galindo created a musical score based on one of Misrach's photographs of a shot-up border patrol target.
    Guillermo Galindo and Richard Misrach, courtesy Magnolia Edition
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