Leeza Gibbons on Dealing With Her Late Mother's Alzheimer's Disease

TV host hopes new book can empower women to live life with confidence and pride.
4:45 | 06/11/13

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Transcript for Leeza Gibbons on Dealing With Her Late Mother's Alzheimer's Disease
She's one of the most well known personalities on TV Leeza Gibbons has been an American talk show host for over twenty years bring her knowledge and fast to every interview and project she embarks on -- now she's on the other side of the table today. Talking to us about an issue that is close to her heart please welcome. His Leeza Gibbons herself -- -- thank you so much well in addition to your television work you've been an author and you've embarked on your second book. Take two. And -- you you talk about giving people. The power to make change in their lives and you aspire to be an inspiration in their lives who has been an inspiration in yours. All of these years my goodness so I think all roads go back to my strong steel magnolia mom. Who really was a force. Changed from the I mean she even loved changes in the weather she loved to storm. Mom to me represented to kind of that solid strengths and when she said when you didn't know what to do stand still and listen. But in reality your music is bound to change and when you're tripping all over yourself because you don't know the steps to your dance. You know you've just got to figure OK I need to leave this stage and I need to go to Wear my new music is playing and I think that. Especially as women that's what we fail to do. You know we don't want to let go of who we used to -- And realize -- we've got to take on new identities and we've got to break up with ourselves and become someone else and that can be really scary. Sometimes it's a change that we need to bring on for ourselves and sometimes it happens for us. Like if we become a caregiver someone that we love gets sick and we have to. You know be that person to help them journey. That's sometimes a resentful place for us. And that's the biggest change a mall and I on the -- do right a lot about that as well I dedicate this book to family caregivers. The husbands and wives and sons and daughters and you mention your mother and that was something you took on your -- suffered from alzheimer's disease and it changed your life had to change your life how will it changes everything. I mean it does. I think it brings you face to face with things you don't want to look at about yourself. On I think you're afraid you're afraid of what you know because you can't sometimes make a pattern you're afraid of we don't know you have no idea how you can manage it. -- -- -- pay for it. And that's why a few years ago I started a relationship that I'm really I'm very product -- I started working with Novartis pharmaceuticals on a website -- for family caregivers like me and it's alzheimer's disease dot com. And we began conversations. -- care giving and our conversations -- care giving is really just designed to help answer questions that we all half. And right now we have registration opened for the next -- which is in July July ninth to -- also in September and October. But they're all right there -- alzheimer's disease dot com you can drop by join -- but if you register it can be very personal for you could you can give us your questions. We talk about I'm reaching. -- you know it's -- how do you know if it's just normal aging how he managed behaviors. What about brain exercises what do -- do how to -- take care of myself. All of that stuff -- so many question in mind all -- you know and and speaking of a journey and change. Your mother's diagnosis and your subsequent work in the field of alzheimer's also led you to walk away from my job where. Yeah we all knew and loved you have with that decision -- tell us about the decision. And what that was like for you. I thought I was going to be leaving television for a couple of years I said you know what. Here's my chance to make my life stands for something else I'm going to start a nonprofit which I did. And we began to open free psychosocial support centers and they're all over the country now Lisa's care connection and -- place really -- after my mother's kitchen. And on we offer you know care for the caregiver. And we caught happen help you calling your courage and some in your strength that two years turned -- to five years and it became a real calling of -- And I on the I went back to work and I now host tonight news magazine called America now on I'm very proud of that. But you know life changes on the way to happily ever after. And that's just the design -- it and I think that. Is really what I wanted to write about in take two and that really that's why we have to hold up the mirror for each other. And say you know wait it's still you. You know you can be stronger and smarter and. Better than ever that it can't mention -- -- -- nominated for an Emmy for you worked with PBS yes and gradually thank you and thank you so much for joining mice Elaine thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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