Woman Suing Match.Com Over Alleged Assault Comes Forward

PHOTO: Carole Markin revealed this morning that she was the woman who brought a lawsuit against Match.com, claiming the website was responsible for an alleged sexual attack.
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The once anonymous woman who filed a lawsuit against the online dating website Match.com because of an alleged sexual assault has come forward to say she's glad her suit got results.

"I'm tired of hiding behind masks and glasses," said Carole Markin this morning on "Good Morning America." "I want to come forward and speak for the other Jane Does and Joe Blows who've been abused by sexual predators and give them courage to do something for themselves."

Last week, Markin, then only publically identified only as Jane Doe, filed the civil lawsuit asking a court to force Match.com to install a sex offender screening system that checks the background of those who register for the site.

The lawsuit had asked for a temporary restraining order that, if granted, would prevent new members from signing up for Match.com until such a program is instituted. It claims Markin and the man went on a date that turned violent.

The lawsuit said the man went to Markin's house after they had dinner last May and he forced her to perform a sexual act. Alan Paul Wurtzel was arrested and charged but no trial date has been set. Wurtzel's attorney maintains the sexual encounter was consensual and a trail date has not been set in that case.

Match.com officials announced Sunday it will start to screen users against a national sex offenders registry.

In a statement issued to the Associated Press, Match.com President Mandy Ginsberg said the website did not implement the screening process for years due to the "unreliability of the database" but after reviewing recent improvements, the company has decided to begin the checks with current and new members.

"I was happy that they listened to us," Markin said. "They're obviously a little afraid of us." She said the company did not talk to her directly and that she has never had a conversation with Match.com officials.

Markin, a successful Hollywood executive and one-time investment banker, is now working as creator of new reality show. She said she was traumatized by the event and is in therapy.

"I have dated other people on Match.com and I've had good experiences," she said. "I just didn't expect that there would be somebody with a criminal background on the service… When you've met nice successful men previously on the same site, you just don't assume the worst."

Her lawsuit has been criticized by some observers, saying the responsibility to investigate a potential date lies with the individual, not the dating web site.

She said that when after first talking to the alleged assaulter, there was a cell phone drop out or she would have Googled the man's name. "I would have known and nothing ever would have happened," Markin said. "What happened to me was a preventable crime."

Markin advised getting as much information about a potential date as possible without being neurotic. "Online dating is kind of like peeling an onion. You meet people and you give them a little information and a little more information."

ABC News' Karen Compton contributed to this report.

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