Fort Hood Shooter Could Join 5 Others on Death Row

Despite being the military's only maximum security facility, housing death row inmates from all branches of the military, Leavenworth does not have the facilities to conduct an execution. Had the execution taken place, Gray would have been scheduled to be killed at the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Ind. on Dec. 10, 2008, said Steed.

Dwight J Loving.

Dwight J. Loving was an Army private serving at Fort Hood when he was convicted in 1989 of robbing and murdering two cab drivers, one a retired NCO and the other a soldier moonlighting as a driver to earn extra money.

On the night of Dec. 11, 1988 Loving robbed the two drivers, shot them each in the back of the head and made off with less than $100 in total. After meeting up with a girlfriend, Loving tried to rob a third driver, who got away.

Attorneys from Cornell University Law School's Death Penalty Project have petitioned the Supreme Court to review Loving's conviction. "If that petition is unsuccessful, Mr. Loving will seek federal habeas corpus review of his conviction and sentence of death," according to a statement on the project's Web site.

Kenneth Parker

Kenneth Parker, the only marine on the military's death row, was convicted and sentenced to death by a court martial in 1993 at Camp Lejeune, N.C.

In March 1992, Parker, a lance corporal at the time, killed one Marine with a shotgun and then another Marine the same way four days later.

Though the court found Parker was the triggerman, he was convicted along with accomplice Wade Walker, a corporal at the time, who was also sentenced to be executed. Walker's sentence was later commuted to life in prison.

For a time following his sentence, Parker was imprisoned at Camp Lejeune while a court determined if he was mentally retarded and could therefore not be executed, according to Army Times.

In 2007 the same court of appeals that commuted Walker's sentence ruled that Parker should remain on death row.

Andrew Witt

Convicted of murdering Sr. Airman Andy Schliepsiek and his wife in their home, by stabbing them each repeatedly and leaving them to die, Andrew Witt, 27, was sentenced to death in October 2005.

Witt, only one of two members of the Air Force to be sentenced to death since 1990, is the only one remaining on death row.

Witt was convicted of murdering the couple as well as attempted murder of their friend Jason King, who survived the attack.

During his sentencing hearing Witt admitted to the murders and apologized to his victims' parents directly: "I'm so, so sorry, from the bottom of my being for taking your son and daughter. To Mr. King, I'm so sorry I hurt you."

Witt's case is under review through the military's automatic appeal process.

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