'World News' Calls Nation's Top Bankers to Explain Foreclosure Crisis

VIDEO: Citigroup Paying Back Billions
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The nation's foreclosure epidemic gathered steam in September, with banks taking over more than 100,000 properties for the first time. Overall, filings rose 3 percent, according to RealtyTrac, an online service that tracks foreclosure rates.

This news comes the day after attorneys general of all 50 states announced an investigation into whether sloppiness or deceit led to the latest episode of the national foreclosure drama, further threatening the recovery of the U.S. housing market.

In courts throughout the nation, homeowner attorneys have alleged that the big banks and lenders forged signatures and improperly notarized documents in the rush to foreclose on homeowners.

So ABC's "World News with Diane Sawyer" decided to go straight to the major financial institutions with some questions. How did these improper foreclosures happen? Did they have anyone read the fine print? Was the foreclosure process being farmed out to international offices? And what about inequity? If homeowners have to jump through hoops to buy a house, why don't the banks have to do the same in order to take a house away?

We e-mailed and phoned the top six banks involved in the mortgage mess, requesting interviews with their CEOs. So far all have declined the request, but below is a list of the CEOs and some basic facts about each bank.

James Dimon, Chairman and CEO, JPMorgan Chase

James Dimon

2009 total CEO compensation: $7,950,000

Mortgage servicing volume (U.S. dollars / Quarter 2 2010): $1,354,000,000,000

2009 profits: $11,700,000,000

2009 taxes: $4,400,000,000

Michael A. Carpenter

Michael A. Carpenter, Chairman and CEO, Ally Financial

2009 total CEO compensation: $802,199

Mortgage servicing volume (U.S. dollars / Quarter 2 2010): $349,000,000,000

2009 profits: $10,298,000,000

2009 taxes: $78,000,000

James E. Rohr

James E. Rohr, Chairman and CEO, PNC Financial Services Group

2009 total CEO compensation: $18,027,856

Mortgage servicing volume (U.S. dollars / Quarter 2 2010): $150,000,000,000

2009 profits: $3,324,000,000

2009 taxes: $921,000,000

Brian T. Moynihan

Brian T. Moynihan, CEO and president, Bank of America

2009 total CEO compensation: $6,510,000

Mortgage servicing volume (U.S. dollars / Quarter 2 2010): $2,135,000,000,000

2009 profits: $6,300,000,000

2009 taxes: $1,900,000,000

John G. Stumpf, chairman, president and CEO, Wells Fargo & Co.

John G. Stumpf

2009 total CEO compensation: $13,780,000

Mortgage servicing volume (U.S. dollars / Quarter 2 2010): $1,812,000,000,000

2009 profits: $12,300,000,000

2009 taxes: $5,300,000,000

Vikram Pandit, CEO, Citigroup

Vikram Pandit

2009 total CEO compensation: $128,751

Mortgage servicing volume (U.S. dollars / Quarter 2 2010): $678,000,000,000

2009 profits: $1,500,000,000

2009 taxes: $6,700,000,000

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