Charles Barkley Wants NBA to Move All-Star Game Due to 'Anti-LGBT' Law

The Hall of Famer and broadcaster wants next year's game moved from Charlotte.

— -- Hall of Famer Charles Barkley is pushing the NBA to move the All-Star game from Charlotte, North Carolina, joining a league of businesses leaders against the state's so-called "anti-LGBT" law.

Barkley said he believed the NBA should move next year's All-Star game from the home of the Hornets.

"As a black person, I’m against any form of discrimination – against Whites, Hispanics, gays, lesbians, however you want to phrase it," Barkley told CNN today. "It’s my job, with the position of power that I’m in and being able to be on television, I’m supposed to stand up for the people who can’t stand up for themselves. So, I think the NBA should move the All-Star Game from Charlotte.”

Last month, Governor McCrory signed into law House Bill 2, formally known as the Public Facilities Privacy and Security Act. The law bans people from using bathrooms that don't match the sex indicated on their birth certificates, which opponents argue is discriminatory toward the transgender community.

Dozens of business leaders have signed a letter to McCrory and state lawmakers, seeking a repeal of the law. LGBT advocacy group Human Rights Campaign coordinated the effort. PayPal announced earlier this week that they are withdrawing plans to build a $3.6 million global operations center in Charlotte, in response to the law.

Proponents include the North Carolina Family Policy Council, which argued in favor of the law in a March 28 letter posted to their site, adding private businesses retain flexibility. "HB 2 does not impact the ability of businesses to adopt their own internal employment, non-discrimination, or bathroom policies," the post said.

The NBA hasn't announced any change in their plans. But the city of Atlanta offered to host the game if it's pulled from Charlotte.