Gwyneth Paltrow: Chris Martin and I 'Are Still a Family'

PHOTO: Gwyneth Paltrow signs her book "Its all Good" during the the 2016 Antiques And Garden Show Of Nashville at Music City Center, Feb. 12, 2016 in Nashville, Tennessee. Terry Wyatt/Getty Images
Gwyneth Paltrow signs her book "It's all Good" during the the 2016 Antiques And Garden Show Of Nashville at Music City Center, Feb. 12, 2016 in Nashville, Tennessee.

Gwyneth Paltrow was widely mocked when she announced that she and ex-husband Chris Martin were "consciously uncoupling."

But two years after splitting, the Oscar winner, 43, told "Live! with Kelly and Michael" that her decision to consciously uncouple from the Coldplay frontman has paid off for their family, especially children Apple, 11, and Moses, who just turned 10.

"I think it's hard. In divorce, there's always pain and hurt and a sense of loss and grief and it's hard to really let go and put that aside and still maintain a family, which is what we're trying to do for the sake of the children, genuinely, so we can all be together and go through life together," Paltrow said. "Chris and I are not a couple but we are still a family."

Since announcing their split in March 2014, the family of four has spent holidays and vacations together.

Paltrow recently told Glamour magazine that she considers Martin like a brother.

"He's been away for two weeks [promoting his album]. Last night he got in at midnight and slept here so he could surprise the kids in the morning. So ... we're not living together, but he's more than welcome to be with us whenever he wants," Paltrow told the magazine in February. "And vice versa: I sleep in his house in Malibu a lot with the kids. We'll have a weekend all together; holidays, we're together. We're still very much a family, even though we don't have a romantic relationship. He's like my brother."

As for Martin, 39, he recently revealed that even though the split was amicable, he still struggled with the separation. Martin credited a poem titled, "The Guest House," by Persian poet Rumi, with giving him a new perspective on his situation.

"That one Rumi poem changes everything," Martin told the U.K.'s The Sunday Times last month. "It says that even when you're unhappy, it's good for you. It took me a year to get it. A year of depression and all that."