Sandra Bullock on getting over the fear of safely raising her 2 kids

PHOTO: Sandra Bullock attends the New York special screening of Netflixs Film "Bird Box" at Alice Tully Hall, Dec. 17, 2018, in New York City.PlayIlya S. Savenok/Getty Images
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When it comes to her two kids, Oscar winner Sandra Bullock admits that she sometimes has to stop being overprotective and let them live their lives.

Bullock, 54, is mother to son Louis, 8, and daughter Laila, 6. In a new interview with People magazine, Bullock confessed, "I’m constantly having to override my fear."

The actress told the magazine that although her top priority is to keep her children safe, she sometimes has to take a step back from always saying "no."

"You literally have to stop and say, ‘Why did I just say no?'" she admitted.

Instead, she told the magazine she tries to regroup by interjecting with something fun like, "Why don’t we just play hooky from school one day and just go enjoy life?"

Bullock adopted her son Louis from New Orleans in 2010 after separating from then-husband Jesse James, and later added Laila to the family in 2015.

“When I look at Laila, there’s no doubt in my mind that she was supposed to be here," Bullock told People of adopting the little girl three years ago.

The interview comes on the heels of the release of her new Netflix movie, "Bird Box." The film features Bullock protecting two children from ominous creatures invading Earth.

The film centers around the fact that if people see the creatures, they will be compelled to take their own lives, and so Bullock and the two children are blindfolded any time they leave the house.

Bullock told People she worked with a blind coach and thought it was important to think about "what is it that the [blind] community wants represented on screen."

"In the few times that we met, [we] were able to take away a few lessons like if we were blindfolded, we could walk in this room, we could tell you were the people were, where the walls were if there was an object there,” she told the magazine. "Your body senses things that we just don’t use because we have our sight."