This plastic surgery center 'for men, by men' touts itself as the first of its kind

The Club House is a place where only men receive plastic surgery.

This plastic surgery center 'for men, by men' touts itself as the first of its kind
ABC News
April 26, 2018, 5:30 AM

Sometimes, a man just needs a place to go and be a guy.

But we're not talking about a locker room. Now, there's a place for only men to receive plastic surgery and non-invasive services like Botox and injections for hair loss.

It's called The Club House, and it's believed to be the only one of its kind in the country.

PHOTO: The Club House, created by Dr. Norman Rowe, a New York City plastic surgeon, is believed to be the only male-only plastic surgery office in the country.
The Club House, created by Dr. Norman Rowe, a New York City plastic surgeon, is believed to be the only male-only plastic surgery office in the country.
The Club House/Rowe Plastic Surgery

Founded by New York City plastic surgeon Dr. Norman Rowe, The Club House, he said, fills a need that's otherwise been ignored.

"It's designed for men, by men, and is a place where men can feel comfortable," Rowe told "Good Morning America."

PHOTO: The Club House is believed to be the nation's first and only all-male plastic surgery center.
The Club House is believed to be the nation's first and only all-male plastic surgery center.
The Club House/Rowe Plastic Surgery

"There are certain things that men would rather be a little bit more private and discreet about whether it's over the phone or in the office. The male patients are often coming for hair plugs or penis augmentations," Rowe said. "An all-male facility makes them a little bit more comfortable."

Justin Barton is one of those men. He told "GMA" he sees Rowe for platelet-rich plasma therapy, also called PRP, a treatment that involves withdrawing a patient's own blood, processing it so that only the enriched cells, platelet-rich plasma, remain, and injecting it into the scalp with the goal of stimulating natural hair growth.

PHOTO: JDr. Norman Rowe, a New York City plastic surgeon, injects a male patient with platelet-rich plasma on a recent visit.
Dr. Norman Rowe, a New York City plastic surgeon, injects a male patient with platelet-rich plasma on a recent visit.
ABC News

"It's a slick atmosphere, like someplace you'd come to have a drink with the guys," Barton said. "It's comforting to come someplace that's focused on male issues."

Rowe estimates that of all his patients 20 to 25 percent are men, compared to a national average of about 10 percent. About 80 percent of the inquiries from Rowe's male patients, he said, come between 1 a.m. and 4 a.m. Most procedures take place before 10 a.m. or after 7 p.m.

It's another way, Rowe said, that his male clients differ from women, who tend to make appointments during regular business hours and come for appointments in a steady stream throughout the day. His female patients are seen at a second nearby office on New York's Upper East Side.

PHOTO: The Club House features a bar as well as other features not typically found in a plastic surgeon's office that caters to women.
The Club House features a bar as well as other features not typically found in a plastic surgeon's office that caters to women.
The Club House/Rowe Plastic Surgery

The Club House's decor is a departure from the look of the average plastic surgeon's office. Instead of white walls and Botticelli playing in the background, visitors to The Club House are immersed in a decidedly male-inspired motif. There's bamboo wallpaper, a shoeshine stand, a small bar, a poker table and a fireplace. ESPN and financial news are broadcast on all the TVs, and 1990s hip hop is played on the sound system.

But it's the changes that aren't immediately visible that matter most, Rowe said.

"A [male] patient doesn't have to whisper, 'Oh, I'm here for a penis augmentation,'" he said. "It's a place where a guy could call up and say, 'I'd like to talk to Dr. Rowe about penis augmentation, hair transplant, hair plugs or hair removal from my back,' and feel comfortable."

Eventually, Rowe said he hopes any shame associated with male plastic surgery will go away.

"I hope that stigma is gone hopefully in 20 years, and a place like The Club House won't be needed," he said. "But until that time comes about, I think I'm providing a service. And the fact that this has exploded and patients are beating down the door literally to get in tells me that there is a need, and we're fulfilling that need. Hopefully, down the road, places like this will not be needed. But until that time comes, we're here."