Teens With ADHD, Depression Risk Internet Addiction

By<b>by Jennifer Thomas</b><br><i>healthday Reporter</i>
October 06, 2009, 11:23 AM

Oct. 7 -- TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers with psychosocial disorders such as ADHD, depression and social phobia are more likely to be addicted to the Internet than other teens, new research suggests.

Because computer use is a way of life in the United States, the potential exists for childhood computer addiction to become a major public health problem, the Taiwanese study authors say.

They asked 2,293 seventh graders, whose average age was 12, to fill out questionnaires that assessed whether they had ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder), depression, social phobia or abnormal feelings of hostility. Six to 24 months later, they were asked about their Internet usage, including how many hours they spent on the Internet and what sorts of sites they visited.

After two years, nearly 11 percent of students were addicted to the Internet. Common activities included online gaming and chatting.

Boys and girls who had ADHD or hostility were more likely to be addicted to the Internet than teens without those conditions. Having social phobia or depression also predicted Internet addiction in girls, though not in boys.

"It makes a great deal of sense to me why children with these kinds of issues would find the Internet utterly compelling," said Michael Gilbert, senior fellow at the Center for the Digital Future at University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication.

"If you have a child that is hyperactive, the Internet can move at their pace," he said. "If you have a child that is depressed or has social phobia, they can get in touch with other kids dealing with the same kinds of issues. They can go into artificial worlds, like 'Second Life,' where they can live out fantasies or take on different personas. For kids who have anger or hostility, the Internet gives them a chance to play out their aggression there."

The study appears in the October issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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