Man With Amnesia Finds His Family After Searching for 11 Years

PHOTO: Benjaman Kyle is seen in this undated photo posted to Wikimedia Commons.Adam Harbottle/Wikimedia Commons
Benjaman Kyle is seen in this undated photo posted to Wikimedia Commons.

A Florida man, who was found 11 years ago with no memory of his past, said he has finally found his family after years of searching.

Benjaman Kyle, of Jacksonville, Florida, was found naked, covered in fire ants and unresponsive in 2004 at a Burger King in Georgia. With no memory of his family or his identify, Kyle took on his current name as he searched for a link to his past.

"I had no idea who I was. I couldn't remember," Kyle told ABCNews.com in 2012. "I had no idea how I got there."

Diagnosed with amnesia, Kyle spent years searching for his family. The search paid off when he announced this month he had finally found biological family members.

A team of people helped sequence Kyle's DNA over the years and then look for potential matches.

“Many people had shared their DNA profiles so that they could be compared with mine,” Kyle wrote on his Facebook page. “Through a process of elimination they determined my ancestral bloodline and who my relatives were. A DNA test taken by a close relative has confirmed that we are related.”

Kyle said he plans on visiting his family next week and is applying to get official identification cards with his actual name on them.

“I wish to thank all of my friends who have supported me over the years with a big thank you to the people who have helped me with this mess,” he said on Facebook.

Joshua Schrutt, a restaurant owner in Jacksonville who hired Kyle after hearing his story on the news, confirmed to ABC News that Kyle had found his family.

Kyle did not immediately respond to interview requests.

In an earlier interview with ABC News, Kyle said he did have some vague memories of his past. He said he believed his name was Benjamin and that his birthday was August 29, 1948. He also said he may have worked in a restaurant before because he remembered how the machines worked and how to fix a stove.

In his announcement that he found his family, Kyle did not confirm if any of his earlier memories were correct.

"You'll find a lot of people who say it's all bogus, that I'm faking it for whatever reason, but one thing's for sure—I'm not getting rich out of it," Kyle said in 2012. "I'm 64. I'm trying to get on with my life as best as I can. I figure I've got 10 more years to live considering my social and economic bracket. I can't make any long terms plans other than try to get along mostly day to day."

ABC News' Christina Ng contributed to this story.

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