Obama Fields Most Colorful Town Hall to Date in Vietnam

Crowds asked him questions ranging from pot use to where he'll be in five years.

His focus was on connecting with young people, explaining their generation will change the world.

"Your generation can look at the world with fresh eyes without some of the old notions, the old habits of a previous generation," Obama said in the town hall with the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative.

"You never know exactly why something inside you clicks and you decide to take a different path," Obama said, explaining he struggled a long time with his relationship with his father. "I grew up."

The president even dropped a beat for a young musician who rapped for him.

Obama received a typical job interview question: "Where will you be in five years?"

"I'll be doing all my organizing work and involved in the public policy issues, but I won't be doing it through a formal way," Obama said. "I'll be a community organizer, except a little more famous that I used to be.”

Without mentioning any candidate by name, the president briefly weighed in on the state of U.S. politics.

"One of the great things about the United States is even when it makes mistakes, it's able to adjust and recognize our mistakes and then we correct course and take different steps," he said.

He reassured the audience that "things are going to be OK. I promise."

Earlier in the day, the president met with seven Foreign Service nationals who served at the U.S. Embassy in Saigon during the 1975 evacuation.

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