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  • <p> A group of airmen from the New York Air National Guard embark on a unique mission to support science every year. Since the mid 1970&rsquo;s, the 109th Airlift Wing has supported scientists logistically from around the world and brought them to remote locations in Greenland and Antarctica to conduct their cutting edge climate, marine, astrophysics, glaciology and earth science.&nbsp;</p> <p> Crew boarding the 109th Airlift Wing's C-130 to start the 6 hour journey to Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. Stratton Air Base in Scotia, NY.</p>
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  • View from the four-engine turboprop Lockheed C-130 Hercules approaching Greenland.
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  • The settlement of Kangerlussuaq in western Greenland is an international staging area for scientists from around the world. Kangerlussuaq, Greenland.
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  • A colorful street corner in downtown Kangerlussuaq, Greenland.&nbsp;
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  • <span style="font-size: 9pt; line-height: 115%; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;">Three-plane support element at Stratton Air National Guard base in Kangerlussuaq</span>
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  • Lt. Col Steve Yandik and Capt. Christine Schwab conduct pre-flight checks at Sondrestrom Air Base.
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  • Lt. Col Steve Yandik walks towards the LC -130 at Sondrestrom Air Base in Greenland.
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  • Lt. Col Steve Yandik flying the LC -130 to Summit Station. He has been with the 109th Airlift Wing for 25 years.
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  • Captain Christine Schwab, navigator for the 109th Airlift Wing. Navigators are the pilot's eyes and they do what's called an AIR Airborne Radar Approach.
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  • Located in the center of Greenland's ice sheet at 11,000 feet, Summit Station is a living laboratory for scientists located on the largest ice sheet in the northern hemisphere.
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  • LC -130 taking supplies out of Summit Station.
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  • An empty LC - 130 ready to bring cargo and passengers back from Summit Station.
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  • Loadmasters Jesse Boden and Troy McCullen check weights and fuel limits prior to landing at Summit Station. The plane was carrying 58,000 lbs. of fuel to deliver to Summit Station.
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  • Summit Station staffer brings cargo to the LC-130.
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  • Group of scientists waiting to board the plane back to Kangerlussuaq from Summit Station.
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  • A view of the ice sheet in the far end from Kangerlussuaq, Greenland.
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  • Area of Russell Glacier where ice is caving. The front of the glacier is located 25 km east of Kangerlussuaq.
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  • Greenland's ice sheet.
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  • Ice on top of Russell Glacier.
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  • Midnight sun in Greenland. In central Greenland the sun does not set from the end of May until the end of July.
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  • After a successful mission in Greenland, airmen from the 109th Airlift Wing on board the C-130 heading back to Scotia, NY. They provide support for Greenland research by transporting scientists, fuel and cargo to and from the various camps in Greenland.
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