Wildlife ecologist Joanne Moriarty noticed familiar movements earlier this spring with Bobcat-339 in the Santa Monica Mountains of California.

Bobcats are nomadic in nature, roaming all over the mountains throughout the day and night. GPS data revealed that 339 repeatedly returned to one spot, a characteristic that indicates "denning,” which normally happens after a female gives birth.

Moriarty explored the situation and found a cute spotted surprise in a woodrat nest: bobcat kittens!

It was like finding a needle in a haystack, Moriarty said, but thanks to the data from 339's GPS, the scientists were able to mark an approximate location among multiple woodrat nests, a common hub for bobcat dens.

Once they heard what they suspected to be bobcat kitten noises deep inside one nest, they attached a GoPro to a selfie stick and probed inside, revealing two newborn bobcat kittens: B-340 and B-341.

Bobcat Kittens are seen in Santa Monica Mountains, Calif., April 21, 2016.(Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area/Facebook) Bobcat Kittens are seen in Santa Monica Mountains, Calif., April 21, 2016.

The video was recently released on social media from the observations recorded earlier in April.

Bobcat Kittens are seen in Santa Monica Mountains, Calif., April 21, 2016.(Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area/Facebook) Bobcat Kittens are seen in Santa Monica Mountains, Calif., April 21, 2016.

The team gathered samples and measurements of the newborn brothers, placed ear tags, returned them to the den and set up a camera trap to monitor for the mother's return.

A bobcat kitten is seen in Santa Monica Mountains, Calif., April 21, 2016.(Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area/Facebook) A bobcat kitten is seen in Santa Monica Mountains, Calif., April 21, 2016.

Eventually, the feline family moved out of the den roaming about the mountains.