Crazy 'California Croissant' Stuffed With Sushi

PHOTO: A look inside the "California Croissant," which is stuffed with sushi.Mr. Holmes Bakehouse
A look inside the "California Croissant," which is stuffed with sushi.

There’s never been a better time to be a croissant lover. In the past year alone, cronuts, cruffins, cragels and more have made all our French pastry dreams come true.

Coming in hot on the croissant mash-up trend is Mr. Holmes Bakehouse in San Francisco with their "California Croissant" -- a croissant stuffed with sushi.

To be exact, it’s the bakery’s signature croissant dough (made with butter flown in from France) filled with smoked salmon, baked seaweed, wasabi and pickled ginger. The Frankenpastry is then topped with furikake, a dry Japanese seasoning usually made with dried fish, sesame seeds, chopped seaweed, sugar and salt, and served with soy sauce.

PHOTO: The exterior of the California Croissant, which is stuffed with sushi. Mr. Holmes Bakehouse
The exterior of the "California Croissant," which is stuffed with sushi.

Sound gross?

Think again. This Asian-French innovation sells out every single day before 11 a.m.

“Oh my goodness, it’s way better than you would ever think, to be honest. When I first tried it, my anticipation was like, ‘This is a little bit of an off-the-wall idea,’” Mr. Holmes Bakehouse owner Aaron Caddel, 23, told ABC News. “I like it way more than I thought I would. I probably have one a day – to my demise. It’s delicious. It’s pretty tame and not fishy or anything because we bake it. It’s delicious.”

PHOTO: Mr. Holmes Bakehouse sells whimsical pastries in a fun atmosphere. Mr. Holmes Bakehouse
Mr. Holmes Bakehouse sells whimsical pastries in a fun atmosphere.

Caddel’s business partner chef Ry Stephen came up with the wacky idea while shopping in the Asian aisle at the supermarket. He then spent several weeks perfecting the recipe that now has San Franciscans lining up out the door for a taste.

“For us here, it’s just a fun pastry. It’s just our way of taking something that everyone knows, and not trying to reinvent it, but just adding our little fingerprint to it and having fun with it,” Stephen, 28, told ABC News. “We use traditional techniques, so it’s really that marriage of the old and the new, which is fun to do."